GOOD

Groundbreaking Photo Series Showcases Wounded Veterans’ Beauty

Trump may not think these guys are heroes. But this man does.

Image via Facebook embed

If there’s one thing extremists from the left and the right can agree on (unless your name is Donald Trump), it’s this: veterans have a hard time in this country. From PTSD, to elevated suicide rates, to vast unemployment, the challenges they face are staggering. That’s why Michael Stokes, fitness photographer, decided he wanted to radically change our image of vets. In a recent photo series, which may become a book, Stokes photographed members of the U.S. Army, Navy, and Marine Corps simply being human.

Keep Reading
Articles

Africans Take to Social Media to Combat Negative Cultural Stereotypes

#TheAfricaTheMediaNeverShowsYou is giving people across the continent a way to share their uplifting stories and images.

Open a paper, turn to the International section, and look under ‘Africa.’ Chances are, you’re highly likely to find images of war, starvation, hunger, or disease. That’s why a group of young Africans on Twitter, organized under the hashtag #TheAfricaTheMediaNeverShowsYou, got together and started sharing powerful and positive images of their continent. From large stadiums to contemporary architecture to high fashion, the campaign has already earned tens of thousands of tweets, and is adding more by the second.

Keep Reading
Articles

Explore the Surprising Faces of Debt In America

The Debt Project, a new series by photographer Brittany M. Powell, illuminates the real people behind the numbers.

Brittany Powell, The Debt Project

Hundreds of millions of Americans currently shoulder staggering debt that threatens to spiral them into financial insecurity. According to a recent study by the Federal Reserve, 1 in 50 households carry more than $20,000 in credit card debt, with the U.S. population as a whole owing more than 2.4 trillion. Of that inconceivable amount, $60 billion is from credit cards, at an average of $7,327 per household. This is not a faceless statistic. Many workers, still recovering from the seismic shock of the Great Recession, give over a sizable portion of their paycheck each month to cover these debts. In a shocking study commissioned by ProPublica and ADP, it was reported, “more than one in 10 employees in the prime working ages of 35 to 44 had their wages garnished in 2013.” Debt, the elephant in the room, is an insidious and often invisible force. Whether it’s from student loans, medical bills, credit cards, or real estate, the burden can feel so substantial that it almost seems like a physical presence in our lives. The Debt Project, a photo series by San Francisco-based photographer Brittany M. Powell, hopes to illuminate what debt really looks like by peering into the surroundings of those living beneath its weight. The result is a group of intimate photos, still under development, that show the real and often banal face of financial hardship.

Keep Reading
Articles

Artist Confronts Mortality With Elderly Alter Ego

With I Used To Be You, photographer Kyoko Hamada explores the joy, humor, and subtle indignaties of growing older.

[/vimeo]

What if you could spend a day with an older, wiser version of yourself? Would you be happy with the choices you’d made? Do you consider yours a life well-lived, and could you be content in a relaxed routine of elderly domesticity? These are exactly the questions 42-year-old NYC-based photographer Kyoko Hamada, who has contributed to The Wall Street Journal, T, and many others, sought to answer with her photo series I Used To Be You, a mock-doc fine art photo collection in which the artist embodies an elderly alter-ego, maneuvering the modern world as well as the limitations of her own body. “Since 2012, I have been photographing myself as the fictional character ‘Kikuchiyo-san’, an elderly woman living a delicate and fragile existence,” explains Hamada on her Kickstarter page. “Kikuchiyo-san represents those who are often left behind and neglected in the race to live, those who have to find ways to navigate through the obstacles and struggles within the modern world, and those brave enough to face its challenges.” Hamada hopes to turn the series of 99 photographs into a bound book with Pocko Editions, one that fuses “humor, metaphors and storytelling to represent the process of living and aging.” The series, as it stands now, is a powerful attempt to confront viewers with the sad, and often overlooked fact, that life is short, painful, sometimes lonely, and forever beautiful—simultaneously.

Keep Reading
Articles