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Genetically Modified Cows Produce "Human" Milk

China's scientists have genetically modified cows to produce "human" milk. Why?


Earlier this month, China held an exhibition to showcase major technical achievements during its 11th Five-Year Plan (2006-2010). Among the wonders on display were photos of a herd of 200 cows that have been genetically modified to produce "human" milk.

Precise details of the bioengineering employed to adjust the composition of the milk these 200 cows produce are not available, nor is it clear exactly how closely the GM cow milk will resemble its human analog. According to the announcement in the state-run news outlet, China Daily, Li Ning, director of the State Key Laboratories for AgroBiotechnology at China Agricultural University, confirmed that the genetically modified herd's milk "contains the characteristics of human milk."

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Feast Your Eyes: Bug Farming for Food, an Animated Introduction

What will it take to persuade Westerners to dial back our burger addiction in favor of bug farming? This new video animates our dilemma.

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If you haven't watched an NMA animation before, you're in for a treat. This short video takes a look at whether rising food prices, shrinking resources, and the environmental impact of raising livestock might convince Westerners to eat bugs, as recommended by the United Nations and enjoyed by several other cultures.

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Peak Fish: The Massive Growth of Aquaculture in China

The world's eating more and more fish. And nowhere is the rise of fish farming more apparent than in China.

Whether you're eating tuna fish sandwiches or considering the fate of the Western diet, the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization's State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 2010 report might have some surprising insights into the way the world eats.

With an estimated one-third of wild fish stocks on the decline and more people eating more fish—about 37 pounds per person per year, or enough to equal the human weight of China—the FAO's authors say that we may have reached a sort of Peak Fish, which means more people are turning to fish farming.

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