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Photo via Cards Against Humanity

Cards Against Humanity—the politically incorrect, fill-in-the-blanks comedy card game—is using its new science-themed expansion pack to fund a scholarship for women looking to enter STEM fields.

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America Cares About Buying Guns, Not Educating Kids

America is set to spend 20 percent of our federal budget on defense and a mere 3 percent on education.

In this year's State of the Union speech, President Obama called for a "Sputnik" movement in education, and asked our nation to do what's necessary "to give every child a chance to succeed" and compete with their international peers. Sadly, the latest federal spending bill includes more than $38 billion in cuts to K-12 and higher education programs. When you look at how much we're spending on defense, it's pretty clear: Our national priority isn't really education, it's buying guns and missiles.

Indeed, on Tuesday, our culture editor Cord wrote about Swedish-based think tank SIPRI's latest report, which details that since 2001, the United States' defense spending has increased 81 percent. And, we spend almost 43 percent of the money the entire world allocates to defense.

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A More Diverse Class of 2015: Harvard Accepts Record Numbers of Black and Latino Students

Of course, the overall admission rate was lower than ever: 6.2 percent.


It's a record breaking admissions season at Harvard University. The Ivy League school received the largest number of applications for admission this year—almost 35,000 students. Then the school admitted a record low 6.2 percent of applicants. But—and this is the really good news—despite the stiff competition, the number of black and Latino students accepted into the class of 2015 might just be the highest in school history.

The class of 2015 is 11.8 percent black and 12.1 percent Latino. That's up slightly from 11.3 percent black and 10.6 percent Latino for the previous year. What made the difference? The school prides itself on its Undergraduate Minority Recruitment Program, an effort staffed by current minority students at the school. They help coordinate recruitment efforts and reach out to prospective minority applicants to answer questions and address concerns about attending the university. It's a smart idea because current students best know what it feels like to wonder if you're going to fit into the academic and social life at a school.

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