GOOD

Anti-Tobacco Efforts Skyrocket After Thailand Introduces Ink Made From Diseased Smokers’ Lungs

For Thailand’s new anti-smoking campaign, the medium is literally the message

image via vimeo screen capture

Smoking is unquestionably awful for you. It fills your lungs with chemicals, causes cancer, and can lead to heart disease, emphysema, and even strokes. Slightly less certain, though, is the most effective method for quitting cigarettes, once you’ve become hooked.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Can John Oliver Make “Jeff, The Diseased Lung In A Cowboy Hat” Big Tobacco’s New Mascot?

The #JeffWeCan campaign mixes iconic mascot imagery with realistic health complications

image via youtube screen capture // last week tonight with john oliver: Tobacco (HBO)

That the tobacco industry spent decades cajoling, manipulating, and downright lying to the American public regarding the dangers of smoking is beyond question. Fortunately, thanks to ongoing efforts by both lawmakers and activist groups, the health risks posed by smoking are now common knowledge in the United States, and as a result, domestic tobacco use has dropped significantly. No, it’s not a problem solved, but given the degree to which tobacco use was once considered an indisputable facet of American life, it’s truly impressive progress.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

This Tuesday, a federal judge ordered some of the world's largest cigarette companies to come clean about decades of false advertising, deceiving the American public about the harmful effects of cigarettes. These charges are claimed to date back to at least the 1950s, when by simply adding a filter, companies branded cigarettes as “lighter” or “safer” and when the “A Frank Statement” ad infamously denied reports that cigarettes caused lung cancer.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

High Minded: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Embrace My Stoner Lifestyle

Enter the stone zone with GOOD's intrepid pot columnist.



The first time I blogged about pot, I sweated for the next few hours waiting for an email to appear in my inbox from the FBI. There are a few reasons for that: (1) I am a nervous law-abiding person; (2) marijuana is, federally speaking, illegal; (3) I was stoned.

I felt really conflicted, as a former D.A.R.E. ad sponge, about pressing publish on a post that contained the phrase “I smoke pot.” On the one hand, I'd had a California state medical marijuana card for a few years, which I obtained after a rough patch with the prescription sleep aid Lunesta. On the other hand, I felt guilty, because I really really like smoking weed.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Yesterday on Twitter and Facebook, we asked our friends: What's the hardest thing you've had to do recently?

We ask a question to our Twitter and Facebook faithful once a day, so if you’re not yet following @GOOD or a fan, make sure to sign up and participate in the conversation.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles