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Senator James Inhofe Thinks a Snowball Disproves Climate Change

A display of cheeky ignorance in the “world’s greatest deliberative body”

Screenshot of C-Span Senate coverage

Now, he may not be some big shot, New York City scientist, with your fancy degrees, and book learnin’, but Oklahoma Senator and late-age prairie bumpkin James Inhofe knows when someone’s trying to pull the wool over his eyes. On Thursday, Inhofe, author of the 2012 book, The Greatest Hoax: How the Global Warming Conspiracy Threatens Your Future, brought a snowball in a plastic bag onto the Senate floor. During a long-winded speech, Inhofe brandished the ball of slush as evidence that this so-called “global warming” chicanery is a bunch of ungodly hoo-ha, obviously disproven by the presence of snow. Because while those pencil-neck nerds at NASA and the NOAA are blabbing on with their numbers and such about how 2014 was the hottest year on record, as anyone can plainly see, it’s cold out there! Cold enough for snow, even! Explain that, you four-eyed brainwads.

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Reduce, Repair, Reuse, Recycle, Reimagine for a Sustainable Snow Season

Nature won’t be here forever if we don’t all take some time to protect it.

The winter season is a magical time, my favorite of the year. The peaks and hills get covered in a fresh coat of white providing a palate for all of us artists to use our minds and imaginations to draw our own lines on the mountains. But they won’t be here forever if we don’t all take some time to protect them.

My dad is an environmental scientist, and I grew up on the beach in Southern California, but I was always drawn to the mountains—my name is Forrest, obviously. It's our duty and our job to help protect the places we love to go to—the oceans and the mountains. I got started with the nonprofit Protect Our Winters in order to do that. We recently got back from a trip to talk with senators on Capitol Hill and the White House to represent the winter sports community in discussing how climate change is impacting mountain communities. It's all about getting educated ourselves so we can educate others. It starts with these five: Reduce, Repair, Reuse, Recycle, Reimagine. Below are some additional ways you can be part of the solution:

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How a Brown Christmas in New Hampshire Brought Climate Change Home

I hoped for a chill in the air, snow on the ground, and Jack Frost nipping at various extremities. Instead, I got 40-degree days and rain.


Here’s a confession: I don’t care that much about climate change. I know it’s bad, but where issues of economic justice and civil liberties always clicked for me, I adopted bien pensant positions on environmental policy without any particular passion—at least until the Brown Christmas of 2011.

Returning to my ancestral home in New Hampshire from my newly adopted residence in Los Angeles, I hoped for a chill in the air, snow on the ground, and Jack Frost nipping at various extremities. Instead, I got 40-degree days and rain. Visions of Bing Crosby no longer danced in my head.

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Digging Out from the Blizzard? Try a Bike Plow

A Michigan man takes a novel approach to clearing his driveway.

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Video: Destroyed Stadium Another Reminder of the Awesome Power of Nature

Just another reminder that you can't stop nature, you can only hope to barely contain it.

If you don't care about football, you might have missed that Sunday's game between the Minnesota Vikings and the New York Giants was postponed because the roof of the Vikings's stadium collapsed because of too much snow. Here's a video:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kh5iE5FA84g

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