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From an education perspective, 2014's State of the Union address was just more of the same.

When it comes to early childhood education, President Obama said, "As Congress decides what it's going to do, I'm going to pull together a coalition of elected officials, business leaders, and philanthropists willing to help more kids access the high-quality pre-K they need." In regards to keeping young men of color on track he said, "I'm reaching out to some of America's leading foundations and corporations on a new initiative to help more young men of color facing tough odds stay on track and reach their full potential."

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Early Childhood Development Is Key to Economic Development

There's an iron-clad link between early childhood development and economic development.


In last week's State of the Union address, the President claimed that "the size of your paycheck shouldn't determine your child’s future," affirming the iron-clad link between early childhood development and economic development.

The economic future of every country rests with its greatest resource—the skills of its people. Today, we know that skills development starts at birth and lays the foundation for achievement in school, college, career and life. In fact, the first three years is the most critically important time to develop foundational thinking and character skills that motivate individuals to learn and function at very high levels. Early learning happens at home and in child care, so it is very important for parents to know how best to develop their child's skills and for their efforts to be supported by child care providers, pediatricians and other developmental resources.

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Psst, President Obama: Our Students Aren't All Future Tech Workers

While ensuring kids acquire the STEM chops they need is certainly a worthy cause, there's a danger to this narrow emphasis.


Will turning America's high schools into hubs of STEM education solve our economic problems? At Tuesday night's State of the Union address President Obama announced, "a new challenge to redesign America's high schools so they better equip graduates for the demands of a high-tech economy." He plans to do that by rewarding "schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers, and create classes that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math—the skills today's employers are looking for to fill jobs right now and in the future."

Except that while ensuring kids acquire the STEM chops they need is certainly a worthy cause, there's a danger to this narrow emphasis. We can't forget that the purpose of school isn't just to serve the nation's economic interests. Indeed, while Andre Perry, the Associate Director for Educational Initiatives for the Loyola Institute for Quality and Equity in Education in New Orleans tweeted that given the President's emphasis on STEM, he better get his "two-year-old more science kits," he also cautioned, "Let's not forget ethics training Mr. President. Science without wisdom = high tech oppression."

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Nine Organizations Already Working to Win the Future

Obama called for renewed hustle in the areas of job creation, innovation, and education. We found nine organizations that are already hard at work.

President Obama called for renewed hustle in the areas of job creation, innovation, and education. We found nine organizations that are already hard at work.

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Obama Does Care More About Climate Change Than Bush, But He Has to Say So

Of course the president understands and cares about climate change. So why's he afraid to talk about it?

A lot of people are making a big to-do of the fact that President Obama didn't even say the words "climate change" during his State of the Union address. London's Guardian went so far as to say, in a headline, that "Barack Obama less interested than Bush" in climate change. As evidence, they included this chart, which reveals "aggregate mentions of 'climate change', 'global warming' and the 'environment' in the state of the union address since 1990."

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Video: Why Are Froot Loops Cheaper Than Real Fruit? The YouTube Video 2011: Your Interview With President Obama

Slow Food USA's Josh Viertel asks Obama a gem of a question during the YouTube Q&A session.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nqoeuIlaxRc

In an attempt to make the 2011 State of the Union address more relevant, The White House had President Obama answer questions on Thursday on YouTube.

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