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The Rotten Side of Apple’s Founder

New documentary Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine digs into the human imperfections at the heart of the ever-popular brand

Director Alex Gibney is not one to shy away from controversy. From his award-winning documentary on corporate greed Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room, to Going Clear, his exposé on Scientology based on Lawrence Wright’s book due out later this year, Gibney often gets to the heart of our culture with a surgeon’s scalpel and objective eye. His latest film, Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine, which premiered recently at SXSW, is both a meditation on our relationship to the Apple devices that have conquered the world and a biography of the company’s titular founder and late CEO. The overarching premise is apparent from the title: the film asserts that Steve Jobs is still a presence in the technology we use every day.

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Looking for The Creative Spark That Fuels Innovation? Take a Shower

How personal hygiene, blue paint, and laughing babies might help you think up the Next Big Thing.


In a creative rut? That lightbulb just not burning so bright? "Creativity is just connecting things," Steve Jobs said famously. Well, that sounds simple enough, but what about when you find yourself bumping up against a wall. There are ways to take action to get you back on the road towards those Big Ideas, points out NPR's Sarah Zielinski. Showering, she writes:

might help spur creative thoughts, as the mind wanders from "lather-rinse-repeat" to a recent problem, and then back again. There's even history to back this up. As the ancient Greek engineer Vetruvius told us, Archimedes was lounging in a public bath when he noticed the water level go up and down as people got in and out. He suddenly realized that water could help him calculate the density of gold.

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Apple University Will Train Executives to Think Like Steve Jobs

A top-secret Apple project will educate executives to think like Steve Jobs.


If you want to honor Steve Jobs' life by following in his entrepreneurial footsteps, forget heading to business school. The Los Angeles Times reports that an Apple team has been working on a top-secret project to create an executive training program called Apple University. The goal? To train people to think like Steve Jobs.

An anonymous Apple employee told the Times that Jobs considered the creation of a corporate university a critical part of Apple’s future. "The idea was to take what is unique about Apple and create a forum that can impart that DNA to future generations of Apple employees," the employee said. "No other company has a university charged with probing so deeply into the roots of what makes the company so successful."

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How Steve Jobs Forever Altered Product Design

The thing that made Jobs the most innovative was his steadfast belief in design.

"Form follows function" is a design cliche that everyone associated with the widening field has heard over and over again. No big brand supports this ethos more than Apple, and with the passing of founder Steve Jobs, we can wholly appreciate this refreshing approach to technology.

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Apple Ranked Dead Last on Pollution, Workplace Safety in China Apple Slammed by Chinese Environmental Groups

Apple ranks dead last in supply chain transparency in China. Are they hypocrites or just being singled out?


A coalition of environmental groups ranks Apple dead last in terms of pollution and workplace safety among a list of multinational technology corporations operating in China. Apple's poor performance in the rankings is based in part on the company's refusal to cooperate with the study. In essence these rankings measure the transparency of supply chains as much as anything else.

The Financial Times and others quote Ma Jun, director of the Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs, a leading Chinese NGO and the main author of the report, as saying: “Apple behaved differently from the other big brands and seemed totally complacent and unresponsive.”

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