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The Five Best Projects from the Imagine Cup Competition

More than 100 student teams are competing to solve a host of environmental, health, accessibility, and education issues. Here are their best ideas.

How do we connect people who could save time and money by carpooling together? Can we diagnose malaria with a smartphone? Those problems—and a host of other environmental, health, accessibility, and education issues—are being tackled by 124 international teams of socially conscious, entrepreneurially-oriented high school and college students as part of Microsoft's upcoming annual Imagine Cup.

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College Graduation Gap Between Black and White Football Players Increases

Ready to watch your favorite team play in a bowl game? Some of those players won't be graduating next spring, especially if they're black.

With the BCS bowl games just around the corner, college football is about to have its day in the sun. But a new study, Keeping Score When It Counts: Assessing the 2010-11 Bowl-bound College Football Teams - Academic Performance Improves but Race Still Matters says that off the field, black players are losing out when it comes to completing their degrees.

Graduation rates for student athletes across the board clearly need improvement, but the University of Central Florida's Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport study found that the graduation rate for white players is increasing faster than the rate for their black counterparts.

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Is Everyone Destined to Cheat?

Two hundred business school students recently admitted to cheating on a midterm after listening to their professor's plea to come forward. Would you?


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After listening to the above lecture by their professor, Richard Quinn, 200 business students in a class of 600 at the University of Central Florida recently admitted to cheating on their midterm exam. The discovery of widespread cheating left Quinn, "physically ill, absolutely disgusted, completely disillusioned, and trying to figure out what the last 20 years was for."

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