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Biking With Your Brain

Stressed-out cyclists may soon be able to find a city’s bike path of least resistance, thanks to a map that mines bikers’ brainwaves.

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

There are hundreds of maps, online, physical, or app-based, that can help you track your exercise and provide you with new outdoor running or cycling routes. Bike maps are especially important for cyclists who rely on the ability to find protected lanes and cyclist-friendly streets in order to remain safe while riding. However, one area all of these maps overlook is the degree of difficulty—not physical, but mental—cyclists can expect to experience on a given route, where tons of traffic or pothole-ridden pavement can make a simple bike commute seem like a matter of life and death.

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Read Our Newest GOOD Guide and Bike for the Planet

Don't just run your errands—bike them! Read our latest GOOD Guide about how to make biking a daily habit.

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Fixing Urban Biking's White Bias, Part II

Urban biking may be on the rise but white cyclists dramatically outnumber cyclists of color, and far more men than women hop on bikes each day.


When Michelle Garcia moved from Oakland, California to Portland, Oregon two years ago, she didn’t see people of color in the bike lanes.

That shouldn’t have come as a complete surprise given that Portland’s population is predominantly white, and despite its mostly progressive tendencies, not very well racially integrated. But new Hispanic and other immigrants continue to boost Portland’s people-of-color population, however, which is now at nearly 25 percent.

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