GOOD
Photo by Thomas Kelley on Unsplash

It's fun to go to a party, talk to strangers, and try to guess where they're from just by their accents and use of language. It's called 'soda' on the East Coast and 'pop' in the Midwest, right? Well, it looks like a new study has been able to determine where a Humpback whale has been and who he's been hanging out with during his awesome travels just from his song.

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Science

SeaWorld's Post Blackfish Syndrome

The future is grim for America's favorite, freedom-quashing, aquatic theme park.

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

It’s been a slow, slippery slide into ignominy for SeaWorld, but the past two years have plunged the company into a Mariana-sized trench of bad publicity—whether the animal theme park can resurface remains to be seen.

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Offshore Nuclear Seismic Testing? Cue the Humpback Whales

The only remaining nuclear power plant in California happens to be both on a fault line and looming over a rich seasonal cetacean feeding ground.


The Diablo Canyon Nuclear power plant near San Luis Obispo in the central coast of California is the state's only nuclear facility currently operating—the San Onofre plant near Camp Pendleton in North San Diego county has been shut down since January and appears to be on the road to decommissioning. There's at least one big problem with the Diablo facility (besides the name): it was built directly above a fault line.

The plant's license to operate for another two decades is in a multi-year review process and certainly the Fukushima disaster has not put Californians at ease when it comes to the combination of nuclear power and seismic activity. The Diablo facility is set to begin a round of off-shore seismic tests next month to map the bathymetry of the sea floor using "high energy air guns" dragged behind a research boat. As you might suspect, the creatures of the sea don't seem to like these experimental explosions. They've been known to flee.

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People Are Awesome: Look at Hundreds of Volunteers Help Hydrate Beached Whales

When dozens of whales ended up stranded in New Zealand—twice—hundreds of volunteers came to their rescue.


When dozens of pilot whales got stranded on a beach in New Zealand last week, "droves" of volunteers and professionals from the Department of Conservation teamed up to help move the animals back into the ocean. But just days later, 65 of the whales had again beached themselves. This time, not only did hundreds more volunteers show up, they stayed with the whales, hydrating them for hours until the tide rose and the whales could move themselves back to sea.

Eventually, all 65 whales survived and made it back to the ocean.

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