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via Denis Shiryaev/ YouTube

When we look back at footage from the past, it subconsciously taints the way we perceive it. It's nearly impossible to think about people living in the 1950s and not see it in our mind's eye in black and white.

It's just as tough to imagine people from the silent-film era without thinking of them in black and white while walking at a jaunty pace. Because that's the only way they were captured on film given the technology of the day.

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The ladies at the website Jezebel frequently make it their business to point out absurd Photoshop incidents in fashion magazines, and rightfully so. As former Jezebel editor Anna Holmes put it, "Magazine-retouching may not be a lie on par with, you know, 'Iraq has weapons of mass destruction,' but in a world where girls as young as eight are going on the South Beach Diet, teenagers are getting breast implants as graduation gifts ... it's fucking wrong."

And it is fucking wrong. However, it makes at least a little bit of sense when the women being Photoshopped are musicians and actresses, professions that, like it or not, often require their members to possess otherworldly features. Where Photoshopping makes no sense at all, not even a little, is in the world of science.

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A Mobile Karaoke Unit Is Community-Generated "Transportainment"

The RVIP Lounge provides free, safe public transportation for partygoers, plus the party itself: It's a moving karaoke stage.


It's probably safe to stay you can get just about anything from a truck in Los Angeles these days. Korean fusion tacos. Thai fusion tacos. Frozen yogurt. Frozen dog treats (not kidding). But do you know of a truck where you can get a rousing version of Kelly Clarkson's "Since You've Been Gone"?

The RVIP Lounge is not a truck, strictly speaking. Rather, it's a fully-functioning RV that provides free, safe public transportation while riders belt out karaoke standards at the top of their lungs.

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While reading Wired's recent feature, "The Web is Dead. Long Live the Internet," Boing Boing's Rob Beschizza took issue with the following infographic, which illustrates the claim that the web is dead based on the total proportion of internet traffic instead of total overall use.

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