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In January 2015, Ashley VanPevenage had her makeup done. Months later, the before-and-after photos would become a viral sensation in the name of cyberbullying.

VanPevenage, a 21-year-old college student, had been struggling with acne and was experiencing an allergic reaction to benzoyl peroxide at the time of the makeover, making her transformation photos a dramatic addition to the makeup artist’s Instagram page. The photos began circulating and were soon turned into a malicious meme, receiving at least 7 million shares across Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube more than a year later.

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The One Joke Donald Trump Didn't Allow In His Comedy Central Roast

“It’s always interesting to learn what is 'sacred' for a celebrity.”

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Presidential hopeful Donald Trump opened up the floodgates for public scrutiny when he launched his campaign for the 2016 presidential election.

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High on the totem pole of digital media are the video content creators revolutionizing the way in which the public ingests shareable, newsworthy and trending content.

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Global warming naysayers may start changing their tune as soon as they get a glimpse at a few recent photos from the arctic.

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Waiter Receives A $500 Tip After Doing The Sweetest Thing For A Stranger

“It's not about the money, it’s about showing someone you care”

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Good karma seems to be following in all directions in Dallas, Texas, this week with Kasey Simmons at the root of it all. The 32-year-old Applebee’s waiter received a $500 tip after delivering one woman a $0.37 check. “They ordered the cheapest thing on the menu,” Simmons told CNN, “Flavored water.”

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Researchers Just Discovered A New Type Of Flame, And It May Help Save The Environment

This ‘fire tornado’ may help clean up oil spills one day

Image via University of Maryland

Scientists at the University of Maryland just unveiled research of a new phenomenon they’re calling “fire tornadoes.” Described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, fire tornadoes — aka, blue whirls — are a small, stable flame capable of significant damage, but as researchers have deduced, likely harbor practical application.

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