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Munch On This Bacon-Flavored Seaweed That’s Healthier Than Kale

Researchers unveil a new strain of an edible, eco-friendly algae that combines the very best of two very different food groups.

image via (cc) flickr user sansumbrella

Sometimes it seems as if we’ve all gone a little bacon-crazy these days. From bacon-flavored alcohol to bacon-inspired art, our lust for crispy, cured pork knows no bounds. But for those who—whether for religious, health, or moral reasons—abstain from eating the stuff, researchers from Oregon State University have just the thing: Seaweed.

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Food for Thinkers: Shooting Sustainably Sourced Fish in a Barrel

Lisa Bramen has some fun asking whether contemporary food fetishization has "Gone Too Far."

With a name like Food & Think, the Smithsonian's food and culture blog was a no-brainer for inclusion in Food for Thinkers week. Fortunately, it's also one of my favorite food blogs—well written, well researched, and enjoyably eclectic. Recent posts have included a look at the people food is named after (who were Sara Lee and Dr. Pepper, anyway?) as well as the history of the soup kitchen (it was invented in Munich by Count Rumford, as part of a scheme to rid the city of beggars).

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Food for Thinkers: Food Writing in the Age of the Internet

Annie Wang of Frites and Fries wonder what a food writer is to do, now that the internet has turned everyone into an expert?

Annie Wang is a food photographer and restaurant widow whose food journal, Frites and Fries, includes recipes, food adventures, and longer posts about food perception and design. In her Food for Thinkers post, she considers the way the increasing "coolness" of food, combined with the possibilities of the internet, have changed what food writing can do:

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Your “Nitrite-Free” Meats Are Full of Nitrites

In a world where organic “nitrite-free” meats are anything but, think twice before you slap some meat on the grill this weekend. Nitrogen...

In a world where organic “nitrite-free” meats are anything but, think twice before you slap some meat on the grill this weekend.

Nitrogen compounds are the basis of chemical fertilizers. They’re responsible for the giant dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico. Terry Nichols, the Michigan organic farmer, used ammonium nitrates to bomb Oklahoma City. Nitrate salts make the color that appears in firework displays. Sodium nitrate (NO3) are also added to dry-cured meats, hot dogs, and bacon. Added nitrate does nothing until beneficial bacteria slowly breaks it down into nitrite (NO2), which prevents further bacterial growth. Nitrites also form nitric oxide (NO), which helps stabilize the color of meats. And a lot of healthy people think that these nitrates and their chemical cousins, nitrites, cause cancer—and are willing to pay a premium to do without.

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