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The Female Farmer Project Chronicles the Rise of Farms Operated by Women

Women, the proverbial gatherers, are operating more farms than ever.

Image via Female Farmer Project

Women working in agriculture is nothing new. In fact, the gender is widely credited as mankind’s original gatherers. In ancient Mesapotamia, a matriarchy, women were in charge of the fields and gardens where cereal was grown. During WWI, a group of women called The Farmerettes mobilized to take over U.S. farms while men fought overseas. In developing countries around the world today, food is largely the product of hard, painstaking work put in daily in fields and patches by local women. A female-driven tractor is certainly not a novelty in the United States. What is new, and at the center of Audra Mulkern’s Female Farmer Project, is the recent surge in female-owned and -operated farms. The unique portrait and blogging series shows the faces and tells the stories of the modern women slowly but surely taking ownership of an industry they’ve long been silent partners in.

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Atlanta Teacher Uses Angry Birds for Physics Lessons

A ninth-grade physics teacher at the private Westminster Schools in Atlanta uses the addictive game to teach the laws of projectile motion.

Addicted to playing Angry Birds? Maybe a better question might be, who isn't addicted to the game? And savvy science teachers are capitalizing on the Angry Birds phenomenon by using it to teach physics lessons.

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"I Was Itching Like a Crackhead": Study Finds College Students Addicted to Media

Students across the globe can't function without media for even 24 hours without experiencing addiction-like withdrawal symptoms.



What do college students in China, Chile, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Uganda have in common? According to a new global study by the University of Maryland's International Center for Media & the Public Affairs (ICMPA) and the Salzburg Academy on Media & Global Change, they're all addicted to media. That might not seem like news—after all, there's a reason the term "CrackBerry" came into being—but just how severely students are addicted is startling, and has real implications for our schools where Skyping, blogging, learning-via-gaming technology is increasingly the norm.

Researchers asked 1,000 students at a dozen universities in ten countries on five continents to abstain from any kind of media consumption—no TV, no smartphone games, no Twitter or Facebook, and no instant messaging—for 24 hours, and then write about how they felt. A majority confessed that they actually couldn't complete the challenge. Even a few hours without access to media made American students feel, "like an addict," and like they were "going crazy. One even wrote, "I was itching, like a crackhead, because I could not use my phone." (CrackBerry, indeed!)

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Food for Thinkers: Your Complete 16-Course Tasting Menu

Your handy bookmark-able guide to the all-you-can-read extravaganza of ideas, stories, opinions, and proposals that was GOOD's Food for Thinkers week.

Last week, as I hope some of you may have noticed, we hosted a six-day Food for Thinkers blogfest. With the launch of GOOD's new food hub, I wanted to stake out an expanded territory for food writing, and at the same time, start building a community of influences and inspiration.

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