GOOD

Would You Wear a Device that Counts Your Calories as You Digest Them?

A health tech company says it has successfully created a reliable calorie-counting wearable.

Depending on how you feel about health and fitness, a real-time calorie-counting bracelet might sound like either the best thing ever or a complete nightmare. At the annual Consumer Electrics Show in Las Vegas this week, health technology company HealBe unveiled a wearable device called GoBe that promises to measure the number of calories you’re digesting as you’re digesting them.

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The Nutrition Labeling Distraction

Menu labeling might not change the way we eat, but that's only part of the problem.

Pretty soon, we're going to start seeing nutrition labels on restaurant menus. And when T.G.I. Friday's and Applebee's menus start look a little more like their packaged food counterparts, will everyone start making better decisions about their apple pies and sugary margaritas? Maybe.

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The New Nutrition Labels for Fast Food Menus: Who Will Read Them?

The federal government is rolling out mandatory nutrition labeling for fast food menus. But they won't make a difference if they're ignored.

It's no secret that we like eating out. Over the last 40 years, we've been doing it more and more. But when we get our meals outside the kitchen, it's a lot harder to know what's in them—and to determine the exact number of calories in that chicken Caesar salad, veggie burrito, or iced soy chai latte.

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"Organic" Foods Pack on the Pounds

We often think organic means fewer calories, and that's why we should institute mandatory calorie counting.


Let's say you're at the mall, and someone offers you some food samples—cookies and potato chips. They're labeled “organic” or “non-organic.” Except this is really just an experiment and all the food is organic, but you don't know that yet and they're asking you what you think about "organic." If you're like most people, you tell them the "organic" food is healthier, tastes better, and has fewer calories.

Jenny Wan-chen Lee recently presented this study—coauthored by Brian Wansink, author of Mindless Eating and a professor at Cornell University—at Experimental Biology 2011.

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