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Science Explains Why Indian Food is Awesome

South Asian foods hold a molecular secret

Photo by Jpatokal via Wikimedia Commons

You probably think you know why you like Indian food. “It’s delicious, that’s why,” you might say. (And if you don’t like Indian food, well, then you have bad opinions and should feel badly about them.) But according to researchers at the Indian Institute of Technology Jodhpur, the cuisines of South Asia harbor a molecular secret that make them particularly appealing to our taste buds.

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Scientists Have Discovered How to Unboil an Egg and It Could Help Cure Cancer

This new procedure reverts a hard-boiled egg into its pre-cooked state.

A group of scientists out of UC Irvine have figured out how to unboil the whites of a hard-boiled egg. Previously thought to be impossible, the procedure has huge significance for the field of cancer research.

Image via Creative Commons

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A Step Closer to Solar-Powered Clothing

Scientists have designed the world's first fiber-optic solar cell, which could eventually be used in clothing.

Most solar cells are two-dimensional, and best suited for hard, flat surfaces like solar panels on a roof. Previous attempts to make solar-powered clothing, like this project from Colorado State University, have (somewhat awkwardly) sewed small flat panels into fabric. But there may eventually be a way to make the threads themselves power sources.

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Infographic: Can You Cook Safely With Teflon?

Overheated Teflon can kill caged birds, but is there any safe way to use the plastic polymer that coats many non-stick pans?

When it comes to pots and pans, no single material is both a good conductor of heat and chemically nonreactive. Aluminum, cast iron, and stainless steel also require oils, which is possibly why chemists developed non-stick pots and pans coated with Teflon—also known as the scary-sounding polytetrafluoroethylene.

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Taste of Tech: Breakfast, Shot from Guns

Reverse engineering puffed rice to make Rice Krispies and other secrets of cereal chemistry from a 105-year-old.

This Taste of Tech post written by Matthew Battles is the fifth in a series exploring the science and technology of food in partnership with Gearfuse. Don't miss last week's post on how to genetically modify your own seed and the police bees that could come after you if you do.

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