GOOD

Yum! Brands Commits to Using Deforestation-Free Palm Oil By 2017

The Union of Concerned Scientists’ palm oil scorecard shines a spotlight on big brands’ environmental practices

Image via pixabay user sarangib

From fried chicken and french fries to shampoo and face wash, palm oil is a near-ubiquitous ingredient used in many of your favorite products.

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GOOD Video: What Does a GOOD Company Look Like?

We're trying to find the midsize companies that meet our high standards, but we want you to help us out.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4bGbPh8iWg

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Coming Soon: The GOOD Company Project

We're making a list of businesses that are working smarter, better, more creatively. What companies do you think we should consider?

We’ve all seen those lists of “best businesses.” This magazine has even published some of them. And while the parameters may vary—most profitable Fortune 500 firms, most exciting start-ups, best places for working parents—we’ve always wondered: What about the process? How do magazines and organizations actually figure out which businesses to highlight?

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Dell Tops Newsweek's Big Company Green Rankings, Flushes Goodwill Down the Drain

Newsweek ranks the biggest American and global companies on their environmental records. Dell takes the top spot.

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Many companies such as IBM, General Electric, and Intel have achieved impressive results from long-standing partnerships with schools, students, and education organizations. IBM’s Reinventing Education program alone has invested approximately $75 million with school partners around the world to develop and implement innovative technology solutions. But the challenge going forward is for more companies to make their mark. From applying technical and management expertise to financial resources to advocacy, America’s business community has a very important role to play in supporting students at all stages of education—from pre-K to college and beyond.

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