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Which Woman Will Be the Face of the New $10 Bill?

The last time a woman appeared on paper currency was 119 years ago. It’s time for change.

Image via Wikimedia

In 1785, the United States Congress adopted the dollar bill as America’s unit of currency. While Alexander Hamilton, Andrew Jackson, and Thomas Jefferson have since been featured, it’s been 119 years since a woman last appeared on paper currency. Just last night, the Treasury Department announced a startling change in policy: on the front of the $10 bill, they would put a woman.

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Why Geopolitical Pettiness Matters

Passive-agressive global politics is more than just posturing – it’s how our world works.

Screenshot from Reuters youtube channel

For most of us, passive aggression is a quintessentially interpersonal experience. Half-nasty notes on office refrigerators, the silent but exaggerated movement of chairs in crowded restaurants—these actions are a manifestation of the pettiness that can exist when individuals can't sublimate their anger into rational communication. It's the sort of festering emotion we like to think does not exist in the efficient superstructures of businesses or governments. Yet even the most austere and respectable institutions can act just like churlish humans. The latest, greatest example of this capacity for extra-human passive aggression comes from a recent spat between Belgium and France.

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Jodorowsky’s Kickstarter Will Trade “Poetic Money” for Your Crude Dollars

The filmmaker hopes to raise enough to launch his new project, Endless Poetry.

By now, everyone knows that the economy is fake and money is just cocaine-and-germ-covered cotton, so it’s no surprise that the 21st century would bring a currency based on something deeper, something universal, something that taps into what Leonard Cohen called “the evidence of life.” Forget about the gold standard, what we obviously need is a poetry-backed dollar.

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