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Imperfect Platform: Things to Think About While Watching the DNC

While watching the cheerleading, it's useful to have a list of issues you wish politicians would address clearly. Here it is.

Matthew Yglesias wrote up a great hit list of five bad ideas in the Democratic platform—exceptions, for him. Like the electorate this cycle, Yglesias focuses his attention on economic issues. One example:

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The Personalized Campaign: How Democrats Are Selling Two Different Obamas

The "first Internet president" has a major thing going for him—the ability to individualize the voter's experience.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K86sztC1ZUs

The 2012 election season has officially begun, and like every incumbent, Obama and his campaign need to sell two Baracks: one for the base, and one for the swing voters. But a lot has changed since the last incumbent ran back in 2004. The digital divide has never been sharper. Personalization is the new curation, thanks to YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, and all the rest. And judging by Obama's first few major campaign moves, he's going to take full advantage of the opportunity to tailor his message to his audience.

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Occupy Wall Streeters Aren't Republicans—Or Democrats

Attention, 2012 candidates: Most Occupy Wall Street supporters have no party affiliation.

Attention, 2012 candidates: When it comes to party affiliation, 70 percent of Occupy Wall Streeters label themselves "independent."

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Poll: White Republicans Believe Their Children Will Have the Worst Future Ever

In a new poll from the Washington Post, white Republicans were far more likely than anyone else to fear America's future.


Though they're richer and vastly more culturally established than their minority counterparts, America's white Republicans fear the future in the United States far more than anyone else in the nation today, according to a new Washington Post-Kaiser-Harvard poll.

Asked if, "when your children are your age now," the standard of living will be better, the same, or worse, a full 60 percent of blacks said better, and only 18 percent said worse. Conversely, and more than a little bit surprisingly, almost a third of white respondents—31 percent—said they believe the future will be worse for their children. Only 36 percent percent of whites have a rosy outlook of the future.

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Obama Barely Leads Trump in New 2012 Presidential Poll

A new poll looking toward the 2012 presidential election has Republican challengers gaining on Obama.


President Obama has certainly seen better days than today, when a new Daily Beast-Newsweek poll has found him to be almost neck and neck with unlikely 2012 presidential candidate Donald Trump. To be more precise, an individual head-to-head ballot test for president had Obama with just a two-point lead over Trump (43-41), who has no professional political experience whatsoever, and who has only said in passing that he might like to be president.

"The Donald" is a long shot, of course, but more worrisome for Obama are the real Republican frontrunners. The poll showed Obama tied with former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, and he's only two points ahead of Mitt Romney (49-47). The president is, however, still destroying Sarah Palin in polling, with a nearly 10-point lead (50-41).

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Negative Ads More Prevalent This Year It's Offical, This Election Was the Most Negative in a Decade

This is the most negative election in recent history. Who got meaner-the Democrats or the Republicans?


A late surge in negative ads turned this election into the most negative in recent history according to an analysis by the Wesleyan Media Project, which has studied this since 2000.

Looking at just the most recent weeks since September 1, the project finds that Republicans are attacking more than Democrats. Fifty-six percent of Republican-sponsored ads (including party, candidate and interest group ads) mention an opponent, compared to 49.9 percent of ads sponsored by Democrats and their allies. Both parties have increased their rate of attacks over 2008 levels. In the comparable seven-week time period in 2008, 49.3 percent of Republican ads attacked, and 42.5 percent of Democratic ads attacked.

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