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Imperfect Platform: Things to Think About While Watching the DNC

While watching the cheerleading, it's useful to have a list of issues you wish politicians would address clearly. Here it is.

Matthew Yglesias wrote up a great hit list of five bad ideas in the Democratic platform—exceptions, for him. Like the electorate this cycle, Yglesias focuses his attention on economic issues. One example:

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The Personalized Campaign: How Democrats Are Selling Two Different Obamas

The "first Internet president" has a major thing going for him—the ability to individualize the voter's experience.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K86sztC1ZUs

The 2012 election season has officially begun, and like every incumbent, Obama and his campaign need to sell two Baracks: one for the base, and one for the swing voters. But a lot has changed since the last incumbent ran back in 2004. The digital divide has never been sharper. Personalization is the new curation, thanks to YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, and all the rest. And judging by Obama's first few major campaign moves, he's going to take full advantage of the opportunity to tailor his message to his audience.

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Occupy Wall Streeters Aren't Republicans—Or Democrats

Attention, 2012 candidates: Most Occupy Wall Street supporters have no party affiliation.

Attention, 2012 candidates: When it comes to party affiliation, 70 percent of Occupy Wall Streeters label themselves "independent."

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Poll: White Republicans Believe Their Children Will Have the Worst Future Ever

In a new poll from the Washington Post, white Republicans were far more likely than anyone else to fear America's future.


Though they're richer and vastly more culturally established than their minority counterparts, America's white Republicans fear the future in the United States far more than anyone else in the nation today, according to a new Washington Post-Kaiser-Harvard poll.

Asked if, "when your children are your age now," the standard of living will be better, the same, or worse, a full 60 percent of blacks said better, and only 18 percent said worse. Conversely, and more than a little bit surprisingly, almost a third of white respondents—31 percent—said they believe the future will be worse for their children. Only 36 percent percent of whites have a rosy outlook of the future.

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