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Got a Small Business? It's Not Too Late to Prepare for Small Business Saturday

Small Business Saturday is a billion dollar boon for independent shops, but less than half are fully online. Here are four programs to help out.

As small businesses ready themselves for the holiday shopping season—including Small Business Saturday—it's important to note that many are missing out on the gains of an online presence.

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Share Your WiFi, Earn Some Cash, Do Some Good

Can selling access to your personal WiFi bridge the digital divide?

You probably can’t use all the bandwidth you pay for each month on your home internet plan. The standard residential Comcast plan offers users 250 GB a month—maxing out would entail sending 50 million emails—and the median user draws only two to three gigs a month. Adam Black, founder of KeyWiFi, wants to put all that excess capacity to good use—and earn you some money in the process.

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Kids of Color Consume a Lot More Media Than White Kids

A new study finds there's a huge difference in how much white and nonwhite children consume media.



A new study at Northwestern University found a huge difference between the amount of media white and nonwhite kids consume. Minority children ages 8 to 18 consume an average of 13 hours of media content a day—about 4-and-a-half hours more than their white counterparts. In the last ten years, this number has doubled for black children and quadrupled for Hispanics.

The report finds that minority children spend one to two additional hours each day watching TV and videos, approximately an hour more listening to music, up to an hour and a half more on computers, and 30 to 40 minutes more playing video games than their white counterparts.

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Efforts such as One Laptop Per Child attempt to address the so-called "digital divide," the access to computers and the Internet by lower income children throughout the world. The argument: These children are at a disadvantage because they aren't exposed to the technologies, information, and, frankly, learning opportunities that others get.

But, maybe a lack of connectivity isn't such a bad thing: A new study out of Duke University's Sanford School of Public Policy finds that having access to a computer could exacerbate the achievement gap in test scores. When families of lower income and minority students (particularly middle schoolers) get these technologies, they tend to post lower reading and math scores.

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