GOOD

GOOD Maker Challenge: Win $2,000 to Innovate Earth Day

We're seeking interesting and creative ways of promoting the Earth Day message.

Keep Reading
Articles

Ethical Style: The Dye-It-Yourself Revolution

Meet the DIY dyers who hope to revive the lost connection between the people who buy clothes and the production processes that create them.

Every Thursday, your Ethical Style questions, answered.

Keep Reading
Articles

To Fight World Hunger, the Secret Ingredient Could Be Bugs

The EU hopes to “exploit the potential of insects as alternative sources of protein” and feel out “their potential incorporation into food."


What would convince you to eat bugs for dinner? What if the global food chain collapsed under the weight of a soaring human population, severe climate change, and diminishing pasture space? The European Union is working on a potential solution for that scenario: It’s spending 3 million Euros to look at bugs’ potential to supplement the continent’s food supply. With the research, the EU hopes to “exploit the potential of insects as alternative sources of protein” and feel out “their potential incorporation into feed and/or food products.”

Insects are a natural food source: They are packed with protein and calcium, low in fat, and offer a cheaper option to farming livestock. Compared to most animals used for food, these cold-blooded creatures spend less energy and nutrients, reproduce faster and in higher quantities, and—if farmed—would emit fewer greenhouse gasses. But bugs also conjure up the image of revolting roach patties and creepy-crawly mealworm larvae. The EU hasn't discussed which particular critters it's looking to fry up, and food producers who take up the cause will probably stay cagey on the secret ingredient—according to the Daily Mail, experts believe that insects will likely be used in food additives under the guise of “animal-based proteins.”

Keep Reading
Articles