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What if every time you put gas in your car you saw a warning label explaining how use of that product contributed to climate change? If labels on cigarette packs are effective in motivating smokers to quit (and others to never start smoking), could this type of label help encourage drivers to spend a little less time in their cars? Or even start asking governments and corporations for cleaner transportation? Our Horizon, a Canadian nonprofit formed in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, thinks so, and is pushing for gas pump warning labels in Ontario.

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Americans Took 10.4 Billion Trips on Public Transit in 2011

Americans are in the middle of a serious flirtation with public transportation.


Last year, Americans climbed onto buses, swiped through turnstiles, and boarded trains 10.4 billion times. That’s not a record number of public transit rides, but it’s close—the second-largest number of public transit rides in the United States since 1957, according to the American Public Transportation Association.

In the 1950s, public transit use hadn’t hit its nadir yet, but had dropped dramatically from the highs of World War II. Americans were abandoning cities for the suburbs and, with gas rationing over and car prices dropping, they were choosing to drive more. Public transit ridership dropped until the 1970s, when it started slowly rising again.

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It's Time for Americans to Chill Out About Gas Prices

Let's exert our energy figuring out how to deal with the root problem.


Gas prices this summer will top $4—maybe even $4.50—per gallon, and we’re already hearing about it. Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich has promised to bring gas prices below $2.50 a gallon (a feat economists generally agree would be impossible), while other Republicans are trying to lay blame for high prices on the president. Yesterday, in a speech at the University of Miami, President Obama fought back against these criticisms, arguing that “there are no silver bullets short-term when it comes to gas prices.” The reality: International oil markets, not national policy, have the greatest impact on the price at the pump, and right now international tensions with Iran are driving prices up.

And in the long term? Gas prices are going to keep going up, and Americans need to learn to deal with it. In May 2001, the year I got my driver’s license, average gas prices clocked in at $1.70 a gallon—which was considered high. A decade later, average gas prices topped out in May at $3.96 a gallon, more than twice the 2001 price. Demand for gas is rising, as average family income in places like India and China grows and more families buy cars. Obtaining oil is also becoming more expensive as companies move offshore or look to unconventional sources like tar sands for supply now that the easiest oil to reach is tapped out. This points to gas prices continuing to rise—to believe otherwise means avoiding the problem instead of facing it.

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Even Fossil Fuel-Friendly EIA Says Massive Expansion of Offshore Drilling Won't Lower Gas Prices

The cold, hard facts on why "Drill, baby, drill" is a canard, and why increasing our cars' fuel efficiency is a much better way to lower gas prices.

With the price of gas up at $3.86 per gallon, opportunistic politicians are again making the stubborn case that this administration's drilling policies are responsible for rising gas prices—or that Obama hasn't done enough to lower the price of gas. They are wrong.

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Three Exxon Valdez's Worth of Oil and Gas Spill Every Year in the U.S.

Most oil and gas spills don't make headlines, but they're happening every day around the country, and they're ruining lives.


We all notice when something on the scale of Deepwater Horizon happens, but according to a bombshell new CBS News special report, hazardous spills of oil and gas are happening "all the time," The six-month investigation found "at least 6,500 spills, leaks, fires or explosions nationwide—that's 18 a day. Overall, at least 34 million gallons of crude oil and other potentially toxic chemicals were spilled." That's triple the size of the Exxon Valdez spill.

These spills are literally happening every day, and very often making victims out of innocent citizens who just happen to live in the unfortunate path of Big Oil and Gas. You can watch video of the report (we can't embed it) here.

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Despite the High Price of Gas, Americans Still Not Sold on Fuel-Efficient Cars

So with gas prices pushing $4 per gallon in many parts of the country, America must be snapping up fuel-efficient cars, right? Not so.


So with gas prices pushing $4 per gallon in many parts of the country, America must be snapping up fuel-efficient cars, right? Not so, according to USA Today:

With regular gasoline now averaging $3.60 a gallon nationally—up from a 2010 average of $2.84—car buyers are thinking more about fuel economy than they were last year. But replacing a large vehicle with a much smaller one is further than many buyers are going.

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