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GOOD Ideas for Cities: Making Walkability Fun

How to encourage more people to walk? Start a series of neighborhood walking tours led by kids.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9GybIkxfRxw

A neighborhood designed for walking provides important health and environmental benefits to its residents, not to mention a greater sense of community. Yet many Cincinnati residents still turn to their cars to run even the shortest errands. How can cities encourage their neighborhoods to make walkability a priority? As part of GOOD Ideas for Cities Cincinnati, Scout Camp proposes a concept that they think will get more people walking and thinking about walkability: A series of neighborhood walking tours led by local kids. As the team surveyed pedestrian advocacy groups, they realized that most walkability campaigns were missing a crucial message: Walking is fun.

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GOOD Ideas for Cities: Promoting Fresh Food Access

Adults living in neighborhoods with no supermarkets have significantly higher obesity rates. How to increase their availability to healthy foods?

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrziEBKUxfY

Studies have shown that the number of grocery stores in a neighborhood has a direct correlation to the rate of obesity in its residents. Without a nearby institution providing fresh produce, shoppers tend to make unhealthy eating choices. How can neighborhoods without a supermarket increase their access to healthy foods?

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GOOD Ideas for Cities: Increasing Parental Involvement

Parental involvement is just as important as a good teacher. How can a city implement a stronger connection between parents and schools?

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ht2wtnya3C8

Conversations around improving education largely focus on ideas for improving schools and teachers. But it has been proven that dedicated parental involvement is just as important for students. How could a city implement a stronger connection between parents and schools? As part of GOOD Ideas for Cities Cincinnati, the Cincinatives team tackled a challenge to increase parental interaction during one of the most important periods of a student's career—early childhood education. Their program, Home Room, focuses on showing parents that everyday, at-home experiences can turn into learning opportunities. A group of trusted community advocates across the city from churches and nonprofits would serve as advisors, holding workshops and serving as a resource for parents. Additionally, Home Room would create a series of learning tools, from apps to flashcards, which would help parents to add lessons to everyday activities.

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