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Four Ways QR Codes Could Revolutionize Education

Get your smartphone ready! There's plenty of potential for these scannable black and white data squares to be used in schools.


Quick Response (QR) codes are beginning to pop up on city buses, in museum exhibits, and just about anywhere people need easy access to information. But we're only beginning to scratch the surface of how they can be used to improve the formal educational experience. As the number of Americans, particularly students, with smartphones continues to grow, here are four ways QR codes could revolutionize learning in the next decade.

1. Digital portfolios for students. Imagine if all students were assigned a QR code at the beginning of the school year—or even the start of their educational career? Every year, instead of putting that student's assignments or projects into a manila file folder that gets sent home (and oftentimes chucked in the trash) the teacher could upload a few examples of papers, projects, tests and quizzes to the QR code. The code could also include links to student videos, blog posts or other multimedia projects. That QR code-portfolio could then be printed on the student's report card, so that the grade becomes about more than just one single letter.

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Education Event Recap: A Conversation About Growing Los Angeles' Tech Workforce

Our panelists and audience were full of ideas on how to educate the STEM professionals of the future.

Thursday night in Los Angeles, GOOD and University of Phoenix hosted "Now Hiring: A Conversation About Growing Los Angeles' Tech Workforce," a panel discussion about how schools, businesses, and government can work together to ensure that we're educating the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) professionals of the future.

The panel was moderated by GOOD CEO and co-founder Ben Goldhirsh and featured an impressive group of influencers making a difference in Los Angeles—Peter Diamandis, Founder and Chairman, X PRIZE Foundation; Eric Garcetti, the President of the Los Angeles City Council; Eric Hirshberg, CEO, Activision Publishing; Bernadette Lucas, Principal, Melrose Elementary Math Science Technology Magnet; and Blair Smith, Dean, College of Information Systems & Technology, University of Phoenix.

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Education Event: Growing Los Angeles' Tech Workforce

We're hosting a panel discussion on how schools, businesses and government can work together to educate the workforce of the future.


We're gearing up for this Thursday's GOOD and University of Phoenix education event, "Now Hiring: A Conversation About Growing Los Angeles' Tech Workforce," a panel discussion that will bring together some of this city's most influential education, business and government leaders.

With panelists like Peter Diamandis, Founder and Chairman, X PRIZE Foundation; Eric Garcetti, the President of the Los Angeles City Council; Eric Hirshberg, CEO, Activision Publishing; Bernadette Lucas, Principal, Melrose Elementary Math Science Technology Magnet; Blair Smith, Dean, College of Information Systems & Technology, University of Phoenix there are sure to be plenty of smart ideas shared that can spur this city into action.

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America Cares About Buying Guns, Not Educating Kids

America is set to spend 20 percent of our federal budget on defense and a mere 3 percent on education.

In this year's State of the Union speech, President Obama called for a "Sputnik" movement in education, and asked our nation to do what's necessary "to give every child a chance to succeed" and compete with their international peers. Sadly, the latest federal spending bill includes more than $38 billion in cuts to K-12 and higher education programs. When you look at how much we're spending on defense, it's pretty clear: Our national priority isn't really education, it's buying guns and missiles.

Indeed, on Tuesday, our culture editor Cord wrote about Swedish-based think tank SIPRI's latest report, which details that since 2001, the United States' defense spending has increased 81 percent. And, we spend almost 43 percent of the money the entire world allocates to defense.

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A Goverment Shutdown Will Seriously Screw Students with Loans

Low-income college students might just not be getting those checks that keep them afloat if the government shuts down.


With the midnight deadline to reach a budget deal looming, we're getting closer to the federal government shutdown. The U.S. Department of Education has announced it will have to furlough 93 percent of its staff, about 4,500 workers, but what's the actual impact on the students of America?

Unfortunately, the DOE grinding to a halt could negatively affect cash-strapped college students, particularly those receiving financial aid through work-study jobs and Perkins Loans. Over 590,000 students at 3,400 colleges and universities have work-study jobs to help pay the bills. The government funnels $951 million per year to colleges, which then use the funds to cut work study checks to students. A shutdown will probably stop those much needed paychecks. Also affected are the 673,000 students at 1,600 schools who have Perkins Loans. During the shutdown period, no new loans will be able to be disbursed to students.

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