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Should North Carolina Neighbors Mention “China” in Their Pig Poop Lawsuit?

Is Asia’s appetite for pork to blame for North Carolina’s pig poop problem?

Photo by (cc) flickr user andjohan

We’ve all dealt with lousy neighbors before, but the North Carolina residents suing Smithfield Foods can say theirs are literally pigs. In 25 separate nuisance suits brought against the company–America’s largest provider of pork—over 500 North Carolinians claim that sub-par pork waste disposal methods are resulting in a disgusting mist of pig feces and urine that wafts over into nearby homes. But, what at first seems like an ordinary, albeit super-gross, dispute between neighbors, is actually just the latest sign of just how intertwined our global economy has made us.

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The Perils and Possibilities of an America Without Affirmative Action

Those who support affirmative action have to prepare for an America without it.


How much diversity on campus is enough? When it comes to the use of race in college admission policies raised by the case Fisher v. University of Texas, that's the question Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts wanted answered during the oral arguments recently presented to the Court. I have a different set of questions: How do those who support affirmative action—and race-conscious policies in general—prepare for an America without them? Secondly, would an America without them be so bad?

Some consider a post-affirmative action America a triumph of post-racialism, some view it as the prelude to a racial apocalypse, and still others fall somewhere in the middle. Whether you are for or against it, the future of affirmative action is questionable at best. While it's true that certain sectors of our society such as business and higher education continue to support the practice, it's less popular among the general public.

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Why Do We Keep Debating Race-Conscious College Admissions?

A lawsuit against the University of Texas' use of race in admissions is set to be heard by the Supreme Court. Not even Walmart supports it.

The spring of my senior year of high school one of my teachers asked everyone in class to share where they'd been accepted to college. I was thrilled that I'd been accepted at my dream school, Northwestern University, but it turned out that a white classmate who'd applied there hadn't gotten in. Although I was acing my honors and AP courses and had stellar SAT scores, I suddenly found myself in the middle of a class debate over whether I had been accepted at Northwestern solely because I was black. The student who hadn't been accepted complained that I'd probably taken her spot at the school.

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Washington Slams Oil Companies with Civil Lawsuit

Washington is suing BP, Transocean, and seven other companies under the Clean Water Act and Oil Pollution act for the Gulf oil spill.


Months after the largest oil spill history in U.S. history, Washington filed a civil lawsuit against BP, Transocean, and seven other companies Wednesday. The federal government's lawsuit joins dozens of others the oil giants are already facing over the spill in the Gulf of Mexico in April.

Attorney General Eric Holder announced that the companies failed to take the necessary precautions to prevent the spill and to adequately monitor it using the latest available technology. Though the companies have previously promised to pay for any cleanup costs, the complaint asks the court to hold them liable for "removal costs, economic losses and environmental damages without limitation," Holder Jr. said.

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