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OWS 1, Wall Street 0: 99 Percent Strikes Fear in the Hearts of Big Banks

Supporters of big banks may be publicly writing off OWS, but privately, they're starting to shake in their boots.


A Washington lobbying firm with plenty of buddies in the finance industry sent a proposal this week to one of their clients, the American Bankers Association. The pitch? For a bargain price of $850,000, Clark Lytle Geduldig & Cranford would conduct “opposition research” on Occupy Wall Street in order to construct “negative narratives” about the protests and sympathetic politicians. CLGC's memo [PDF], obtained by MSNBC, warns that a Democratic alliance with the movement "has the potential to have very long-lasting political, policy and financial impacts on the companies in the center of the bullseye.” It goes on to say that the "bigger concern should be that Republicans will no longer defend Wall Street companies.”

The memo takes for granted that Democrats will successfully harness the power of OWS to their benefit, citing Democratic strategists who have identified the movement "as a way to tap this populist anger." It remains to be seen whether Occupy Wall Street will align themselves with or donate to elected officials or candidates; unlike the Tea Party, OWS activists seem intent on calling out the corruption of politics rather than propping up a particular party. Regardless, it's probably a safe bet that OWS supporters won't be voting Republican—a big problem for Wall Street.

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"Guerrilla Drive-In" at Lincoln Center Shames Koch Brother

The battle against the Koch brothers now include: Justin Bieber inhalers, free movies, giant stickers, popcorn, comedy, and jail time.

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Video: The U.S. Chamber of Commerce's Dirty Money Influence, Told in Graffiti

Watch this time lapse graffiti video taking down the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and get pumped for Power Shift.


Our friends at 350.org (or should I say, the new 350.org?) released a great new video this morning for their "The U.S. Chamber Doesn't Speak for Me" campaign, which we at GOOD are partners on.

[vimeo][/vimeo]

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Money Pollution: The Chamber of Commerce Darkens the Skies

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is a front for the biggest corporations and polluters. Small businesses are saying "the chamber doesn't speak for me."


In Beijing, they celebrate when they have a “blue sky day,” when, that is, the haze clears long enough so that you can actually see the sun. Many days, you can’t even make out the next block.

Washington, by contrast, looks pretty clean: white marble monuments; broad, tree-lined avenues; the beautiful, green spread of the Mall. But its inhabitants—at least those who vote in Congress—can’t see any more clearly than the smoke-shrouded residents of Beijing.

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Do Your Doctors Take Cash From Drug Companies? Find Out.

A new ProPublica report and database lets you search for your own doctors by name, to see who is taking money from pharmaceutical companies,


In what is bound to be a bit of a bombshell for the medical and pharmaceutical-drug worlds, ProPublica's latest in dirt digging allows patients to search for their doctors by name and see which, of any, pharmaceutical companies have had them on their payroll.

Called "Dollars for Docs," the report and accompanying database is blowing the lid off these dealings which for for a long time have been kept secret. Last year seven companies—representing just 36 percent of the market, or $109 billion—started disclosing which doctors they worked with, and ProPublica did the math. Pharma's spending on doctors—for speaking engagements and consulting and so forth—totaled $257.8 million last year.

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