GOOD

Round Em Up: Bike Corrals Moving Into Streets Nationwide

A dozen vehicles where only one fit before? Sounds like an idea worth stealing.

How often to do you find yourself foraging desperately for bike parking? You've pedaled to your local cafe or to the hardware store or to the bar and you have to scrounge around for some viable place to lock up your wheels. A parking meter perhaps? Maybe there's a free street sign? Or a tree? Figuring out what to wrap one's U-lock around is part of the urban cyclist's conundrum.

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Does Teach For America's Summer Institute Really Prepare Teachers for the Classroom?

Institute guru Susan Asiyanbi responds to some of the common critiques of the intensive process.


Over the next few weeks, 5,200 new Teach For America members will become first-year teachers in some of this nation’s most challenging school settings. In lieu of a traditional, year-long teacher preparation program, they just spent five weeks attending one of the organization's eight summer training institutes. That short time span makes the institute an intense experience, and critics say it can’t truly prepare corps members to teach.

The institutes are overseen by Susan Asiyanbi, Teach For America’s executive vice president for teacher preparation, support and development, who draws on her personal experience growing up on the South Side of Chicago and working as a corps member in Newark, New Jersey, as well her Kellogg M.B.A. We caught up with her to find out what the organization is doing to improve its training program, and got some answers to some of the common critiques of the process.

GOOD: What does a typical day at the institute look like for a corps member?

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Help Decide Which High School Gets Obama as a Commencement Speaker

Six high schools are competing for the President to be their graduation speaker, and it's (partially) up to a public vote.


As part of the "Race to the Top Commencement Challenge," some lucky high school is going to have President Obama speak on campus on graduation day. A public vote, happening this week, will take the current pool of six finalists down to three semi-finalists, and then the President will choose the final winner himself.

Each of the schools—Booker T. Washington High School (Memphis, Tennessee); Bridgeport High School (Bridgeport, Washington); High Tech High International (San Diego); Pittsburgh CAPA 6-12, School for Creative and Performing Arts (Pittsburgh); Science Park High School (Newark, New Jersey) and Wayne Early Middle College High School (Goldsboro, North Carolina)—made brief videos and wrote short essays spotlighting what makes them unique—whether its diversity, overcoming poverty, or an innovative curriculum.

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Lessons for Mark Zuckerberg and Tomorrow’s Philanthropists

What happens when the money runs out? How to secure a long-term impact through philanthropy.


When people want to make a difference, they often reach for their checkbooks. A very public example is Mark Zuckerberg, the co-founder of Facebook, who recently wrote a $100 million check to benefit the Newark public school system. This is a generous act, but individuals and businesses alike would be wise to consider how they can really make the most impact. With so many resources necessary (and available) to make social change happen, is giving money really the best path to making the greatest impact?

Zuckerberg’s action is indicative of an emerging trend. The “new entrepreneur” wants to make money while defining his or her social “footprint.” Unlike the old guard, which waited to donate money post-retirement, the new entrepreneur represents a union of real-time business ambition and social-impact intent. But if new entrepreneurs like Zuckerberg want to achieve the goal of uniting money and meaning, and of shattering the firewall between profit and purpose, they need to understand that philanthropic contributions are inherently different from business investments.

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Facebook’s $100-million Donation: Amazing Generosity or Wasted Opportunity?

Are donations more productive when they're used to finance change-or when they are used to motivate it?


Unless you’ve been on vacation for the past two weeks, you’ve no doubt heard about Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg’s $100 million donation to the city of Newark, New Jersey’s school system. To say that the do-gooder water cooler has been abuzz would be an understatement. And I think that’s appropriate. No matter your feelings on Facebook (essential tool? colossal waste of time?), $100 million is a staggering sum of money, one that is surely worth our attention—and our discussion.

Zuckerberg has built an empire worth roughly $25 billion and, for now at least, he appears to be putting some of it to good use. The guy took out his checkbook, wrote down a bunch of zeros, then went and hung out with Oprah on national television. When the story first broke, there was speculation about his motivation. Maybe he was trying to make up for Facebook’s recent privacy-related scandals. Perhaps it was a preemptive strike against The Social Network, which casts him as power-hungry and petulant. As interesting as these theories are, you know who doesn’t give a damn about his motivations? Newark.

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