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Vision Zero: Designing Streets to Save Lives

A Swedish design proposal to eliminate traffic fatalities is picking up steam around the world.

View of Gotgatan street in Stockholm. Photo via Holger.Ellgaard/Wikimedia Commons

The language we use influences how we think about the world around us. For example, in my first years of transportation advocacy I learned to use the word “crash” to describe vehicular collisions. I, like many Americans, had always used the word “accident,” a term which unwittingly affirms that vehicle collisions are unavoidable, unpreventable, and a fact of life. However, while most crashes are unintentional, they are not always unpreventable. The key to prevention is accepting that humans will definitely make mistakes and then designing the built environment accordingly.

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Walkable Communities: There's A Show About That

Expanding on short films produced for everybodywalk.org, City Walk explores walking from the perspective of experts and pedestrians.



The simple act of walking offers tremendous benefits for your health, the economy, and the environment. City Walk, a new six-part TV series on walking that premiered earlier this month. The focus of City Walk is to showcase how walking is transforming cities across the county and, in the process, reconnecting us with our bodies.

Expanding on short films produced for everybodywalk.org, City Walk explores walking for public television networks KCET and LinkTV from the perspective of experts and pedestrians. It also captures a growing nationwide effort to reverse the trend of a sedentary lifestyle by spotlighting walkable neighborhoods in major cities. The call to action: discover urban areas by foot.

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Occupied Ground: Parklets in Former Street Parking Coming to Los Angeles

The parklet movement is really starting to catch on with a pilot program in auto obsessed LA next.

The parklet movement is growing and Los Angeles is finally getting into the game. Not to be outdone by its neighbor to the north, the Southern California metropolis will soon join San Francisco as host to these pint-sized public spaces in an effort to cultivate a more pedestrian-friendly streetscape.

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Bike-Loving French City Wants to Lower Speed Limit to 18 mph Strasbourg, France to Make Speed Limit 30 Kmph

Strasbourg has a windy city center and a vision for shared streets. Residents will soon vote on lowering the speed limit to encourage more walking.


The city of Strasbourg in northeastern France has announced a plan to reduce vehicle speed limits throughout the city to 30 kilometers per hour, or just 18 miles per hour.

Treehugger reports the city, the capital of Alsace, is already one of the most bike-friendly cities in France, and much of the city already operates on limit of 18 mph. One goal of the measure is to reduce crashes, particularly those involving pedestrians and bikes, but the stated reasoning according to the mayor is a city of shared streets.

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