GOOD

The Last of the Moche Wave Riders

An eroding shoreline and oblivious tourists threaten a beloved local tradition that pre-dates the Incas.

Omar runs the Surf School Muchik with his brother in Huanchaco—a colorful beach town with a population of about 15,000 along northern Peru’s desert coast. Before the Incas came to dominance, this land was home to the Moche people from A.D. 100-800, then the Chimú until A.D. 1470. Huanchaco fishermen and surfers can trace their ancestral lines back to these cultures, and Omar is proud of his ancient surname, Huamanchumo.

In his classroom, he introduces new students, both foreign and Peruvian, to the principles of surfing—as well as the story of his family and the school. He explains that Huamanchumo was the name of a Chimú ruler and that Muchik is another name for Moche. (Though some academics suggest that the groups are distinct, locals consider the terms to be interchangeable.) And he delights in telling them that here in Huanchaco, they are in the birthplace of wave riding.

Keep Reading Show less
Features

Watch These Undercover Mothers Catch Their Catcalling Sons In The Act (UPDATED)

When it comes to fighting street harassment, mothers know best. (UPDATED)

image via YouTube.

Odds are that we’ve all heard someone say something incredibly vulgar or hurtful or inappropriate and thought to ourselves, “You talk to your mother with that mouth?” Well, in this anti-street harassment video, that exact sentiment is taken to the next level. As The Huffington Post explains:

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Watch: Peruvian Prison Aerobics

Watch as Alejandro Nuñez del Arco transforms his fellow inmates in one of Peru's most dangerous prisons with Full Body aerobics.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Picture Show: Clothing Factories of Lima, Peru

Peruvian Pima cotton is world renowned as a high quality fiber, so it's no shock that clothing manufacturing is big business in the South American nation. Earlier this year, the photographer Joseph Pfeifer traveled to Lima, where toured five clothing manufacturing sites, each of which employs on average 1,500 to 2,000 people.


Peruvian Pima cotton is world renowned as a high quality fiber, so it's no shock that clothing manufacturing is big business in the South American nation. Earlier this year, the photographer Joseph Pfeifer traveled to Lima, where toured five clothing manufacturing sites, each of which employs on average 1,500 to 2,000 people. Most of the factories are vertical operations, meaning that they turn raw materials into finished products in one location; they also stay open 24 hours a day, though individual employees don't work longer than 10-hour shifts. Pfeifer's photographs offer a look at the impressive scale of these operations, as well as a window into the lives of people who create the products that many Americans buy.

"It's very rare for me to get an unobscured, inside view of a country," says Pfeifer. "I found a real sense of community among the workers. Looking at these factory towns, which were often backed against hills topped with cardboard houses, it was easy to let guilt come into play. Then again most of these people were making decent wages and working under good conditions."

What follows is a selection of Joseph Pfeifer's photographs of Lima, Peru.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Picture Show: Heavenly Views of Peru's Sacred Valley

The photographer Michael Hanson has taken his camera all over the world, from Fiji to Rwanda, and throughout South, Central, and North America. While working with National Geographic, he lead a photography workshop for a group of students in Peru's Sacred Valley, not far from the site of its famed peak Machu Picchu.



The photographer Michael Hanson has taken his camera all over the world, from Fiji to Rwanda, and throughout South, Central, and North America. While working with National Geographic, he lead a photography workshop for a group of students in Peru's Sacred Valley, not far from the site of its famed peak Machu Picchu. During his time away from the classroom, Hanson took his lens to the surrounding area. What he found was a remarkable culture that's as hard to describe as it is amazing to experience.

"What stands out to me about these photographs is that if I hadn't taken them, I don't think I could tell you what year or even decade they came from," Hanson says. "There's a timelessness to the place—from the food to the clothing—that's beautiful."

What follows is a selection from Michael Hanson's "Peru, Sacred Valley."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles