GOOD

GOOD Pictures: Immigration and Assimilation in South Central Phoenix

Eduardo Rivera's photographs invite us into people’s homes, showcasing warm kitchens and laundry hanging on the line.

GOOD Pictures features work by a new photographer each week, with a focus on up-and-coming artists. It is curated by Stephanie Gonot and Jennifer Mizgata.

How much does personal history inform a photographer’s work? Eduardo Rivera’s "131" series begs the question. Born and raised in a tough neighborhood of South Central Phoenix, Rivera's family moved to a nicer part of town when he was a pre-teen. As an adult, he went back to document the neighborhood of his youth. Rivera writes, "What I found was people and their spaces. Here, since the 1970s, old Mexican traditions have met new assimilated lifestyles as a search for identity and belonging persists." He says it's "a place where hope strives to live."

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Radishes in Suburbia: Documenting Urban Growth and the End of a Family Farm

Threatened by sprawl, a fourth-generation family farmer documents his doomed way of life with time-lapse video.


When Matthew Moore returned to his family's 1,000-acre carrot farm outside Phoenix in 2003, he was struck by how much the landscape had changed. During the seven years the 35 year-old spent studying sculpture in San Francisco, the city had expanded into the surrounding land. What was once a 30-minute drive into civilization was now a stroll across the road. A new Target big-box store broke ground nearby and a Wal-Mart is close behind.

Few cities epitomize suburban sprawl in the United States like Phoenix, Arizona. Over the last half century, the city has become the nation’s 6th largest metropolitan area, and with more than 4.1 million people, was one of the fastest growing until the housing collapse took some the wind from its sails.

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Articles

Your Tax Money at Work: Steven Seagal and Cops Storm a Cockfighting Ring with a Tank

The action hero plays cop in an absurd show of force in Phoenix.


The Maricopa County Sheriff's Department, with actor Steven Seagal in tow, stormed a Phoenix-area home on Monday in what some are calling a misuse of force. According to eyewitnesses, SWAT forces blew the windows out of a home suspected of running a cockfighting ring before rolling over its walls with armored vehicles and a tank. Seagal, who was filming an episode of his reality cop show, Lawman, was riding in the tank.

Neighbor Debra Ross was not amused. Terrified, she called 911 because of the ruckus, but she soon relaxed when she saw what all the commotion was about. "When the tank came in and pushed the wall over and you see what's in there," she told a local news station, "and all it is is a bunch of chickens."

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Articles

Honey I Blew Up the Baby

The Western suburbs of Phoenix are home to a very large baby-one that could eat those Texas-sized donuts we ordered near Austin like Cheerios.

[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/16575789[/vimeo]

The Western suburbs of Phoenix are home to a very large baby—so large, in fact, that this tyke could eat those Texas-sized donuts we ordered near Austin like Cheerios.

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Articles

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Articles