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Gluten-Free Hysteria Crystalized in New Digital Art Museum

A mysterious blog reimagines famous artworks as carb-free masterpieces.

d’après Johannes Vermeer

Over the last few years gluten, a protein found in wheat and many common grains, has been vilified as the cause of everything from weight gain to fatigue to acne. Last year, “gluten-free diet” popped up as one of the top 10 most-searched health terms on Google, and if you went by hyperbolic internet buzz alone, you’d wonder why the government hadn’t banned the stuff years ago. Gluten-free hysteria has become such a part of our cultural lexicon that it was even parodied on South Park. But now, for the first time, the fearsome gluten has gone high art with the creation of mysterious, anonymous blog Gluten Free Museum. The site’s enigmatic creator has painstakingly removed, via Photoshop, all traces of gluten from some of history’s greatest masterpieces. Grant Wood’s American Gothic loses its pitchfork, Vermeer’s The Milkmaid goes without her bread, and the impressionist pastoral wheat landscapes of Vincent van Gogh have been rendered barren. Currently the Gluten Free Museum contains only 20 works, each of which juxtaposes a before and after the great-gluten-rapture:

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GOOD community, you are awesome. Since the devastating tornado in Moore, Oklahoma last week, over 300 of you have volunteered to help victims restore family photos damaged in the storm. In a disaster, after making sure the people around us are safe, photos are one of the first things many of us would grab as we leave our homes—though digital pictures might be common now, that just makes the older prints of our childhoods, and parents, and grandparents, that much more special.

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People Are Awesome: Teen Ballerina Shames Seventeen Magazine To Stop Photoshopping

Julia Bluhm was fed up with the pages full of pixel perfect girls touched up and thinned out with the digital magic wand. So she organized.

Glossy magazine bosses take note: Beware of fourteen-year-olds in tutus with progressive agendas. Julia Bluhm of tiny Waterville, Maine was fed up with opening the pages of Seventeen Magazine to find pixel perfect images of girls touched up and thinned down with the magic wand of Photoshop. So she did what any social media savvy young person would—she ascended her digital soapbox. Nearly 86,000 Change.org petition signatures later, her digital organizing has rattled the windows of a 17th floor Manhattan office and Bluhm has swayed the teen media titans. No more Photoshop slim models in the pages of Seventeen Magazine.

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Saudis Use Photoshop to Hide Mariah Carey's Flesh

In Saudi Arabia, women are photoshopped not to attain inhuman perfection, but to become more modest.


More often than not, when we broach the topic of women getting photoshopped, the issue is that alterations make cover girls look absurdly thin or render them bizarrely absent of even the tiniest flaws (most of which should not be considered flaws in the first place). However, when Mariah Carey albums get sold in Saudi Arabia, photoshoppers opt not to make her thinner or more scantily clad, but to cover her up.

Check out Jezebel's slideshow of the silly additions to make a more modest version of the singer.

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