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The Prop 8 Decision Doesn't Guarantee a Supreme Court Case

Proposition 8 may have been ruled unconstitutional, but that doesn't mean the Supreme Court is going to weigh in.

Gay-rights advocates (and decent human beings) cheered yesterday when a federal appeals panel ruled by a 2 to 1 vote that California’s Prop 8 banning same-sex marriage is unconstitutional. The majority argued that there's no “legitimate reason for the passage of a law that treats different classes of people differently," and that Prop 8 "serves no purpose, and has no effect, other than to lessen the status and human dignity of gays and lesbians in California."

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Taking to the Streets

Profiling L.A.’s most famous and infamous riots.

Every three months, GOOD releases our quarterly magazine, which examines a given theme through our unique lens. Recent editions have covered topics like the impending global water crisis, the future of transportation, and the amazing rebuilding of New Orleans. This quarter's issue is about cities, spotlighting Los Angeles, and we'll be rolling out a variety of stories all month. You can subscribe to GOOD here.

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Proposition 8 Goes to Court: Do Gays Get to Marry Yet or What?

No, not yet, unfortunately. Here's a quick backgrounder and an explanation of how today's events fit into the saga of same-sex marriage in California.


No, not yet, unfortunately. Here's a quick backgrounder and an explanation of how today's events fit into the saga of same-sex marriage in California.

In November of 2008, California's voters approved Proposition 8, a ballot measure that banned gay marriage, 48 to 52 percent. Gay marriage in the state was off.

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