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What's Your Fixophobia?

I’ve been getting a lot of requests lately—requests I never anticipated. Can you help me fix my iPhone display? (Indeed I can). Will you show me...

I’ve been getting a lot of requests lately—requests I never anticipated. Can you help me fix my iPhone display? (Indeed I can). Will you show me how to repair my laptop’s trackpad? (Sure—which one?) What’s the best hack for my Nintendo 3DS? (I don’t know, but I can find out).

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Five Easy Repairs to Extend the Lifespan of Your Things

I have a dilemma—a New Year’s dilemma. At a time when resolutions dominate the season, resolutions are the one thing I dread. Every January, I...

I have a dilemma—a New Year’s dilemma.

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Confessions of a Female Fixaholic

Fixing isn't just a boy's sport. It's for everyone.

All right, so I'm gonna let you in on a little secret. But you gotta promise you won't tell my fellow iFixiters. I'm not a fixer.

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This Saturday, we’ll be celebrating Neighborday with hammers and paintbrushes—1,200 volunteers across San Francisco will repair 11 community facilities, nine homes, and two small businesses, all in low-income communities. April 27 happens to coincide with the 24th annual National Rebuilding Day, and Rebuilding Together San Francisco will be out in force.
In one project, at the Mission Neighborhood Centers, a team of 40 volunteers will transform a beautiful old building in the heart of the mission district. Since 1959, the Mission Neighborhood Centers have supported children, youth, families and seniors in San Francisco by providing essential services to the community.
The building on Capp Street is a vital neighborhood resource that supports the Head Start and Senior Lunch programs. It's in need of important repairs so that it can continue to serve its community residents. RTSF volunteers will be upgrading electrical systems in kitchens and classrooms, doing carpentry work in the courtyard, and re-painting throughout the building.
In one day of service, RTSF sponsors and volunteers will ensure that the Neighborhood Center can continue to serve as a safe meeting place for neighbors and community members. It’s one project in a long line—since 1989, we have rehabilitated more than 2,000 homes and 290 facilities serving tens of thousands of people. For elderly and disabled low-income San Franciscans, the work we do creates safer environments and makes it possible for people to live independently for a longer time in their own homes. For nonprofits and community facilities like the Neighborhood Center, our repairs help keep programs running.
If you’re in San Francisco, we invite you to join the RTSF community and help us create safe and affordable neighborhoods in the city. For those in other cities, take a look at the national Rebuilding Together site to see if there’s another affiliate near you.

Hang out with your neighbors on the last Saturday of April (a day we're calling "Neighborday"). Click here to say you'll Do It, and here to download GOOD's Neighborday Toolkit and a bunch of other fun stuff.

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Brand-new 'green' products tend to get attention for a particular feature, like recycled materials or better manufacturing. But the most sustainable products are the ones that don't get thrown away in the first place. Repair can be tricky, especially if you're missing an entire part (and if it seems cheaper to run to IKEA to get a replacement). But a new site has an interesting model for helping match up broken parts.

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London-based designer Paulo Goldstein began repairing things early in life. When his GI Joe toys broke, he'd disassemble them and build pieces from each one into a new, Frankenstein-like version. He liked the fact that he didn't need to throw away toys that he'd grown attached to, and he liked the sense of control that repair gave him. As a graduate student at Central Saint Martens, still obsessed with repair, Goldstein focused his final project on how to fix products in a way that isn't simply utilitarian, but is a little more like art.

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