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Put it on My Tab! Square Makes Purchases Zipless

The new payment app could change the way we shop.


In the very near future, I’ll be able to walk into the grocery store, have the cashier ring up a box of Graham Oh’s, say, “Oh, hi, I’m Tim Fernholz,” and walk away without handing over cash or cards. Nope, it’s not shoplifting—it’s Card Case, an innovative new app that aims to change the way we shop.

Card Case is the latest product from Square, the company co-founded by Twitter founder Jack Dorsey to revolutionize the way we pay. Square’s eponymous product is a card reader that plugs into your phone and allows you to process credit and debit card payments straight from your bank account, minus a 2.5 percent commission for the middle man.

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The Future of High Tech Shopping Is Closer Than You Think

From "instant try-on" cameras to TSA-style scanners that determine the best jeans for you, technology is coming to your shopping mall.

Brick-and-mortar shops are worried about losing out to online retailers, and they're gearing up to fight back with technology of their own. A new report from brand and trend consultants PSFK uncovers a bevy of new screens, sensors, and even TSA-style scanners that could alter the way we shop in person.

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Infographic: Who's Winning, Walmart or Amazon?

Sure, Walmart is the biggest retailer on earth. But these stats suggest it won't be that way forever.

Walmart is fresh off a Supreme Court victory in its labor practices case, but take a quick look at some of the trends in this graphic and you might conclude its very business model will become a relic long before sex discrimination is.

Walmart is a business behemoth, no doubt about it. It's doing great, making a healthy profit, growing well.

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GOOD Design Daily: Nike's Corporate Social Responsibility Agenda

Nike spells out its goals for sustainability and social initiatives with a dramatic, intriguing website.

There's one way to appease your consumers when it comes to corporate responsibility: Make your goals public, so your audience can hold you to them. Using an intriguing interaction design format created by Wieden+Kennedy with Ian Coyle and Duane King, that's exactly what Nike has done with its new site Nike Better World, which launched this week. Part corporate social responsibility report, part New Year's resolutions, the site covers Nike's programs—from environmental initiatives to socially focused sports leagues—opening with a quite brazen introductory statement: Don't Tell Us What We Can't Do.

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