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If You Really Love Nature, Don’t Live Anywhere Near It

Almost universally, people living in urban locations have a much smaller environmental footprint.

Ironically, not the home of a nature lover

I used to share an office with an older man, a nature lover. He put in a full career working for the government as an environmental engineer and was just counting the days until his retirement. His dream was to move 30 miles south of the city, right on the lake, a famous migratory spot and thus a favorite site for birding. There was nothing wrong with his dream, per se, and it’s a fairly common and simple one, almost clichéd, for members of his generation. Nature lovers often seek to literally own a piece of it, to behold it by living life within its depths. Many have dreamt of catching a glimpse of deer grazing in the backyard over morning breakfast or hearing the cry of a hawk at night.

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The New Retirement: Making a Difference

Retirees seeking "encore jobs" that make a positive impact are on the rise.

If we're being totally honest with ourselves, not everybody can afford to take a job that has a positive social impact and hold it down for their entire working lives. Not everybody finds themselves in that position, and not everybody thinks in those terms early in their career.

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How Americans Spend Their Money, Organized By Class

Ever wonder how your fellow citizens in adjacent (or distant) income brackets live?

Ever wonder how your fellow citizens in adjacent (or distant) income brackets live? The sharp folks over at NPR's Planet Money assembled this handy chart to give us a glimpse inside the budgets of American households, organized by income group.

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On Track for $1 Trillion: Student Loan Debt Greater Than Credit Card Debt

For the first time in history Americans owe more on their student loans than on their credit cards. That's going to make growing up hard.


Last June, for the first time in history, Americans owed more on their student loans, a record $833 billion, than on their credit cards, $826.5 billion. The amount owed on student loans increases at a rate of about $2,853.88 per second, meaning we're on track for total student debt to cross the $1 trillion mark sometime this year.

According to Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of FinAid.org and Fastweb.com, this increasing student debt has long term, macroeconomic implications for our society. He told NPR's Marketplace that the amount of money students owe—on average, $24,000—is usually repaid over a 20-year time frame, which means

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