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On the 50th Anniversary of the 1963 Chicago Public Schools Boycott, Segregation and Unfair Resourcing Endures

50 years ago the largest organized protest against Chicago Public Schools took place. Why are we fighting the same battles?

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One of the largest and most overlooked civil rights actions of the 1960s took place in Chicago. Fifty years ago on October 22, 1963, many Chicago organizations that were part of the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations (CCCO) staged a school boycott. 250,000 students did not attend school, and at least 20,000 marched on the streets of Chicago.

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Change Only Happens When We Come Together

A visit to the Museum of Tolerance and to 3 World's Cafe taught us that change only happens when we come together.

Growing up in a low-income community, it's easy to see first-hand what the effects of prejudice really look like. We have neighborhoods and schools that are still segregated, gang violence, and we live in food deserts. It feels like no one cares about our suffering and that people who have more are fine with our communities being this way. And when you turn on the news, you only hear that we are lazy, violent, and uneducated. They say we're a menace to society. This week, spending time at the Museum of Tolerance on Los Angeles' Westside and at 3 Worlds Cafe in South Los Angeles made us reflect on how the kind of hatred that created the Holocaust affects our community today.

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A City Education: Telling the Truth About Modern School Segregation

A City Year Orlando corps member reflects on what attending a segregated school means for his students.


In our A City Education series, City Year corps members share their experiences working as tutors and mentors in schools in hopes of closing the achievement gap and ending the dropout crisis.

By all accounts, the walk down Auburn Avenue in downtown Atlanta is very different today than it was 50 years ago. What was once a truly vibrant black community is now divided by Interstate 75 and Interstate 85. Those overpasses don’t just serve as highways. Underneath one in particular is a paradox that embodies the community today. One side of the street is a large sculpture of Martin Luther King Jr.—a reminder that this is the place that produced our nation’s greatest civil rights leader. On the other side, the highway serves as a roof for the city’s most unfortunate and forgotten citizens.

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Vintage Racism: The "We Don't Want Trouble" Defense Makes a Comeback

Want proof that "post-racial America" is a myth? Look no further than a timeworn racist excuse.

Back in the Jim Crow days, there were two basic approaches to racism in the segregated South. You were an aggressor—a lawmaker wedded to segregation, a member of a lynch mob, a scientist trying to prove non-white people were inferior, or your garden variety white person who might use a racial epithet. Or you were a bystander—someone who maintained the status quo by saying, "We don't want any trouble."

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Sex, Rape, and Single-Sex Dorms: How Promoting "Virtue" Can Make It Hard to Prevent Violence

Catholic University of America is instituting sex-segregated dorms in an effort to curb "risky" sexual behavior. It will only make sex riskier.

Across the country, colleges and universities are beginning to open their on-campus quarters to co-ed roommates. Meanwhile, the Catholic University of America is taking steps to further segregate the genders. "I know it's countercultural," university president John Garvey wrote in the Wall Street Journal last month on his decision to make each of the school's residence halls single-sex. Garvey called it a "slightly old-fashioned remedy that will improve the practice of virtue."

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Anyone writing about ethnic strife in China’s remote Xinjiang province has an obvious opening anecdote: Han Chinese in the region run their clocks on Beijing time, but the large local Uyghur population goes by earlier hours. Tensions between the two groups—which came to worldwide notice during last summer’s clashes in the capital city of Urumqi—run old, deep, and overt. Segregation is even sanctioned in Xinjiang University dorms.

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