GOOD

As a husband and wife team, our passion for food began in Italy, where we witnessed the beauty of slow food culture. Playing a central role in the lives of Italians, food is something to be cherished and enjoyed, not rushed. Food brings people together and creates strong communities and in Italy, we noticed that they cared about where their food came from. It had a profound impact on us. This idea of real food being a catalyst for building healthier, stronger communities is what motivated us to become involved in promoting local food in the Twin Cities of Minnesota.

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Last week on Twitter and Facebook, we asked our friends: How often do you cook at home?

We ask a question to our Twitter and Facebook faithful once a day, so if you’re not yet following @GOOD or a fan, make sure to sign up and participate in the conversation.

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Food Studies: What Happens When You Quit Pre-Med to Become a Farmer?

From pre-med to Greenpeace activist to farmer: Arianne McGinnis wants to make a new system instead of opposing or fixing the existing ones.

Food Studies features the voices of volunteer student bloggers from a variety of different food- and agriculture-related programs at universities around the world. Don't miss Leslie's last post, on how we might re-evolve table manners and dining rituals to make eating a better experience.

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Video: Why Are Froot Loops Cheaper Than Real Fruit? The YouTube Video 2011: Your Interview With President Obama

Slow Food USA's Josh Viertel asks Obama a gem of a question during the YouTube Q&A session.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nqoeuIlaxRc

In an attempt to make the 2011 State of the Union address more relevant, The White House had President Obama answer questions on Thursday on YouTube.

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Healthy Eating 101 With CoFed

CoFed creates sustainable, student-run cafes & food stores at college campuses as an alternative to the typical fast food options offered.

Will junk food be a relic on college campuses? Maybe so: This summer, GOOD told you about CoFed, a training program and research institute founded to empower students to create ethically-sourced, community-run cafes on college campuses. Instead of fast food, students can grab healthy, organic, affordable alternatives. They're now working with eight schools: University of Washington, Oregon State University, Humboldt State, UC Davis, UC Santa Barbara, UC Berkeley, City College of San Francisco, and Cal Poly San Luis Obispo.

CoFed Director Yontan Landau ( who co-founded the organization with Alex Stone) reports that check-ins with campuses have revealed amazing successes, "in many cases beyond what we could have guessed in such a short time." One school has a vice provost devoting staff time and a cafe space committed rent free, for example, while another is partnering with their local grocery co-op and has already raised several thousand dollars. The Berkeley Student Collective, the initial inspiration for CoFed's work and already a fully-student run food store, is opening its doors on Bancroft Avenue in November, and has already been attracting national press.

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Novella Carpenter, Urban Cowgirl

My parents were back-to-the-land hippies; they were of that generation in the late 1960s that decided to reject cities and move...

My parents were back-to-the-land hippies; they were of that generation in the late 1960s that decided to reject cities and move to the country. I hated rural life. The first chance I got, I moved to Seattle and started loving cities. But I realized that something was missing: There wasn't a connection to nature, to land. So I started vegetable farming. I got some chickens. I started beekeeping. Pretty soon, I was full-on gardening and raising animals.When I moved to Oakland, California, in early 2003, I started doing the same thing, but in an apartment with a squatted piece of land next door. I had come to this neighborhood, where everyone was from somewhere else. I was always struggling with my identity. When I realized that I was a farmer, it suddenly made sense. It was why I was living in this poor neighborhood. The way I deal with living here is by offering something to the community. That's why the garden is open and people can come pick stuff and harvest freely. I like people picking their own stuff; it's empowering; it's educational.This is the ultimate slow food: planting it yourself, harvesting it yourself, cooking it yourself. That's why I'm into urban farming. All of a sudden you see things differently. You see the carton of milk at the grocery store, and you question where it came from. That's why it's so wonderful to be a producer. You become aware of the cycles. I can notice that if Beebe, my goat, is in a good mood, her milk might taste a little different. Or I'll notice that the chickens' eggs look a little different or taste a little different because they were eating a certain green. Food tastes better when you have a story connected to it. So part of the appeal of the local food experience is the story. The story is part of the satisfaction. It's the same thing with the meat. It takes 18 months to make prosciutto. It's only when you know that, when you've done the work, that you can see why it's so celebrated.

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