GOOD

This Woman Wants to Prove That Somalia Is Serious About Democracy

Fadumo Dayib’s presidential candidacy forces the African nation to reckon with its alienated political populations.

Fadumo Dayib is an accomplished woman. The 42-year-old mother of four spent 12 years as a healthcare and development specialist with organizations such as the European Union and United Nations, tackling problems like forced migration, gender issues, and HIV/AIDS prevention. And as of this September, Dayib, both a doctoral candidate at the University of Helsinki and fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, is also angling to become Somalia’s first female president. In her candidacy, she acts not an isolated individual, but also as the apotheosis of Somalia’s female and diaspora populations’ ballooning political heft.

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GOOD Reads of 2014

Here are 7 reads you might’ve missed.

In 2015, we will take you to the four corners of the globe to tell stories about improbable individuals shouldering mammoth struggles and about big ideas crystallizing in very small places. In the process, we hope to add rigor to the conversation about what it means to be a “global citizen” in this day and age. Before we march forward, we’d like to take the occasion to re-share some of the most compelling of our reads from 2014 that you might have missed the first time around. All of us at GOOD, wish you a happy and healthy New Year.

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A Thread of Hope

Somalia’s most important remittance operator is locked in an epic battle with government regulators.

You may have walked past the sea-green sign in cities all over the world, from Bosaso to Hargeisa to Mogadishu, from Dadaab to Detroit to Dubai. The inconspicuous storefront follows the scattered Somali people wherever they settle, inscribed with an unassuming, sans serif font that reads: “Dahabshiil: Fast Money Transfer You Can Trust.”

Dahabshiil is Somalia’s largest remittance operator, managing over two thirds of the payments sent home from family members working abroad. This money is an essential source of income for a struggling nation entrenched in a 23-year-old civil war. In 2012, The Africa Report named the company’s CEO, Abdirashid Duale, the world’s fourth most influential African.

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Hot Dogs for Cultural Acceptance in Minneapolis

Hot dogs are tasty, but can they build cultural acceptance? A food-cart entrepreneur thinks so.

Labor Day may mark the end of the United States' unofficial hot dog season, but a new a line of hot dog carts in Minneapolis is just getting started. Halal Hotdogs is a collaboration between MFA candidate Brian Wiley and leaders from the city's Somali community. Wiley came up with the concept in his social design class at the Minneapolis College for Art and Design as a way to build acceptance for Somali culture in the greater community by using food as a catalyst.

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Project: Design a Poster Promoting Alternative Holiday Gifts

MercyCorps wants you to help promote the idea of giving to the developing world during the holidays.


This holiday season, you will be spending a lot of money on gifts for your family and friends, and they will be spending a lot of money on you. What if you used some of that money to help people in the developing world? During the holidays, Mercy Corps offers people a chance to give gifts, like using $70 to buy a goat for a farmer in Zimbabwe, $33 to purchase crickets for an entrepreneur in Indonesia, or $125 to refurbish a classroom in Somalia. To help promote this kind of gift giving, Mercy Corps is asking the GOOD readership to design a poster to help promote the idea. The money that could go to these alternative holiday gifts could improve lives and, in some small way, change the world. Your design of a compelling poster could help accomplish that. Design, at its finest, has a history of driving social change. We hope you can continue in that tradition.

the OBJECTIVE
Create a poster promoting alternative gift giving.

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