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Infographic: Leaders and Laggards in Famine Relief

As world leaders gather for the U.N. General Assembly, this infographic calls out countries that aren't doing their part to fight famine in Africa.

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Just in time to shame the laggards of foreign aid as they arrive at the opening of this year's United Nations General Assembly, ONE.org released this infographic called "Fight the Famine." It shows that major donor countries like Italy, Spain and Japan are all ponying up less than half what they should, according to United Nation's framework for giving, thanks in part to a tough global economy.


Currently, a terrible famine in Somalia is hurting more than 12 million people. The United Nations has called for donor countries to send $2.48 billion in aid, but it's not coming in.

Those countries all have problems of their own, between Japan's spate of disasters and sovereign debt pressure in countries like Spain Portugal and Italy, whose bond rating was downgraded yesterday. It's understandable that they'd hold back on writing checks for African food aid this year, but there are several laggards without such clear excuses, like France.

Kudos to Canada and the U.K. for picking up the slack. Even the U.S. is doing mostly what it should. Here's the breakdown below. Full size here.

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via Jason S Campbell / Twitter

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