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In San Francisco, 17,000 tons of clothes and other textiles end up in landfills every year. The city also faces employment challenges; if you're not in the tech industry, it can be a tough place to find a job. GOOD teamed up with the Mayor's Office of Civic Innovation, Goodwill, and Adaptive Path to put out a challenge to San Francisco citizens: What new, locally-made product or service could be created from textile waste?

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2Wyt2HFJWE

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The Bike of the Future is Here: Behold the Electric Wheel

Two electric bicycle wheels are pushing their way into the market: the Cophenhagen Wheel and the FlyKly Smart Wheel.



The push for more livable cities has meant an equal push for more flexible transportation options. In other words, more bicyclists, more bicycle infrastructure, and, well, more types of bicycles.

Two all-in-one electric conversion wheels are being developed by two different startups: the Copenhagen Wheel and the FlyKly Smart Wheel. Both promise an improved cycling experience without the need of a new frame.

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I don't know about you, but my shower blesses me with amazing ideas. Convincing others of their brilliance, though, doesn't always happen so fluidly. Let's be honest, for many of us "cerebral-types," the thought alone of having to explain yourself to hundreds of onlookers could result in discrediting bright ideas long before they ever get to that point.

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You probably use Facebook to connect with friends and family, LinkedIn to connect with your professional network, and Twitter to connect with those with common interests. But could you also use a social network to connect with the neighbors on your block?
The digital world is sometimes blamed for keeping people from connecting in real life, but we believe it can also be a tool to bring a community closer. Getting to know your neighbors can be tricky. We’re all living incredibly busy lives, and even if you think you could just walk over and introduce yourself to your neighbors, it might just not happen. In fact, 28 percent of Americans don’t know any of their neighbors by name.
Knowing that over 65 percent of all online adults use social networking sites, a group of experienced entrepreneurs created a new solution: Nextdoor.com, a free and private social network for neighborhoods. 79 percent of Americans who use an online neighborhood forum talk with their neighbors in-person at least one time a month, compared to 61 percent of all Americans. We see this happening all the time with Nextdoor—online conversations are often brought offline.
Posts about lost dogs go up on Nextdoor and then the dog is returned in person. Neighbors plan parties on the site and then will get together for the big event. Members notice a crime increase in the neighborhood and use the site to organize a neighborhood watch meeting. By giving neighbors an easy way to meet one another and communicate, Nextdoor actually creates real-world connections that would not have happened without using technology.
For example, neighborhoods on the East Coast used Nextdoor to provide real-time Hurricane Sandy alerts, safety tips, updates on electricity, and met in person to offer their support. Other neighborhoods across the country used Nextdoor to organize fundraising events in their neighborhoods to help those in need.
We believe that amazing things can happen just by talking with the people next door. Technology is a powerful tool for making neighborhoods stronger, safer places to call home.

Hang out with your neighbors on the last Saturday of April (a day we're calling "Neighborday"). Click here to say you'll Do It, and we'll send you GOOD's Neighborday Survival Guide and a bunch of other fun stuff.

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