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You Can Extract the DNA of a Strawberry by Making This Delicious Cocktail

Who could have guessed biology would taste this good?

image via youtube screen capture

DNA is not usually the sort of thing I think of as a delicious way to relax at the end of a long day, but that’s probably because I’m not a synthetic biologist. Oliver Medvedik, on the other hand, is, and in this TED-produced video, the co-founder of New York community biolab GenSpace demonstrates how to extract the deoxyribonucleic acid from a common strawberry by making a pretty decent looking cocktail. All you need are frozen strawberries, pineapple juice, a filter, and some high-proof alcohol. It’s surprisingly simple:

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Architecture by the People, For the People

Who are the architects of tomorrow? Maybe all of us. Wikihouse, from British designer Alastair Parvin, lets anyone download free 3D files for...

Who are the architects of tomorrow? Maybe all of us. Wikihouse, from British designer Alastair Parvin, allows anyone to download free 3D housing files, change them up in Google Sketchup, and print out all of the parts on a CNC machine. It's an open source construction set. "Basically," Parvin says, "You end up with a really big IKEA kit."

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PSA: Please Stop Saying '21st Century Education'

Grant Lichtman went on a cross-country trip to 64 schools in 21 states to find out how we prepare our students for their future, not our past.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZEZTyxSl3g&feature=youtu.be

If you ever find yourself sitting in a meeting—or listening to a politician's speech—about education reform, it's pretty much guaranteed that you'll hear mention of how schools need to ensure kids are "21st century learners," who are acquiring "21st century skills," in a "21st century classroom." But in the thirteenth year of the 21st century, what does any of this "21st century education" talk mean—and is it even happening?

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How the 100,000-Student Classroom Came to Life

Peter Norvig, one of the creators of the free online classes being offered by Stanford, shares what he learned about teaching to the globe.

\n\n\n\n\n\n Last fall the kind of education once reserved for students attending the nation's elite colleges and universities became available to everyone, thanks to Stanford professors Peter Norvig and Sebastian Thrun. They leveled the higher education playing field by offering a virtual version of their reknowned Stanford class, Intro to Artificial Intelligence to the world for free. Over 160,000 students from around the globe signed up for the 10-week class and the enthusiasm around it sparked a MOOC—massive open online course—renaissance.

In this six-minute TED talk, Norvig shares what they learned about teaching to a global classroom. He describes how they borrowed innovations and learnings from various education entities, like the Khan Academy and Teach For America to ensure they had a class that would be "equal or better in quality" than what they offered on campus. They also tapped the expertise of individuals like Benjamin Bloom's findings on one-on-one tutoring and Harvard professor Eric Mazur, an advocate of peer learning. "Peers can be the best teachers, because they're the ones that remember what it's like to not understand," says Norvig.

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