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These Teenagers May Finally Gain the Right to Delete their Online History

British teens just might earn the legal right to take down their embarrassing selfies forever.

Image via Flickr user Gary Knight

We all make mistakes. But teenagers, well—they make a lot a lot of mistakes—especially when they publish something on the internet. Recently, the British government decided they wanted to ameliorate the situation, and introduced a bill that would enjoin tech companies to allow teenagers to (finally, for good) delete their online histories.

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Summer Maker Camp Brings DIY Creativity to Life For Teens

At Maker Camp, tents and mosquitoes are totally optional.


Looking for a camp where tents and mosquito bites are optional? Thanks to Google and MAKE magazine's Maker Camp, a just-launched virtual summer camp that's rooted in "DIY, making, creating, crafting, hacking, tinkering, and discovery," teens can learn how to make everything from an easy balloon blimp to a rocket-propelled toy car—and it's all free.

The way Maker Camp works is each day at 2 PM EDT for the next six weeks the folks running it will post a different project or activity as a Google+ hangout. The hangouts feature an "accomplished maker" who walks students through the day's project. Or, if there's a maker space in their community, students can head there to interact with both makers and other student participants.

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Five Moments Teen Pop Stars Became Sex Symbols

In honor of Justin Bieber's post-puberty rebrand, here are some top moments of teen stars owning their sexual awakenings.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4GuqB1BQVr4

On March 1, Justin Bieber turned 18 years old, and a few weeks later, he released his single, "Boyfriend." The song offers the same fantasy as always—he just wants a girlfriend to cuddle, and that girl is you, baby—but this time, the Biebs sounds smoky, breathy, seductive, wheedling while semi-rapping about fondue and swag over a stripped-down beat. His lyrics say "love," but his voice says "sex." In the song's video (a pretty blatant Timberlake knock-off), he's a mere shadow of his former self. Gone is the cheesy smile, the purple hoodie, the video games. Instead, there's lip-licking, waist-grabbing, and a scantily clad girl—no, woman—sitting atop his very, very fancy car. A new GQ profile calls out this calculated reinvention for what it is: part hormones, part rebrand.

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