GOOD

How to Say No, Resist Temptation, and Stick to Your Goals

How the “right words” make it easier to say no.


Learning how to say no is one of the most useful skills you can develop, especially when it comes to living a healthy life.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

25,000 Mornings: 8 Ways to Improve Your Morning Routine

Here are some strategies that you can use to get the most out of your 25,000 mornings.

You’ll wake up for about 25,000 mornings in your adult life, give or take a few.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

The first time I truly used a networked computer I saw it as the way out. Instead of being enslaved to big corporations—as employees and consumers—we’d be able to work on our own time, create value directly for other networked people, and get out of the obligatory, expansionist race against the debt clock that was destroying our planet.

But once WIRED and the other technology business folks got wind of the coming digital age, they framed it quite differently. No, digital technology wouldn’t liberate us from the values of the Industrial Age; it would amplify them! Instead of letting NASDAQ deflate and die its natural death, we could use the promise of the dotcom era and the “long boom” of infinite expansion to pump some more steroids in there.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Help Build a Vibrantly Multilingual World

This tremendous richness of human linguistic diversity took thousands of years to develop, yet it is rapidly disappearing.


Most people don’t know this, but there are a lot more languages spoken in the world than the ones we hear every day. In fact, there are around 7,000 different languages, and each one tells a part of the story of our human experience on Planet Earth.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

If You Lived Here, You'd Be Home Now: Holiday Time in Boston

Growing up in Boston in the 1980s, the holiday season ushered in wool crewneck sweaters and baggy corduroys in shades inspired by autumn vegetables.

Growing up in Boston in the 1980s, the holiday season ushered in wool crewneck sweaters and baggy corduroys in shades inspired by autumn vegetables. Winters were rain-slicked and cold, and when it snowed, snow quickly gave way to slush. L.L. Bean duck boots were in flourishing abundance, worn by everyone, like they’d been air-dropped over Beacon Hill during some humanitarian footwear aid mission. On Newbury Street—an affluent but hip stretch of downtown with a Virgin Megastore at one end and the Ritz-Carlton at the other—a preppy procession of college students in navy peacoats and fleece pullovers hoisted backpacks over their shoulders and gripped shopping bags from Benetton and the Gap. In the window of Betsey Johnson—this was back when I wore black lace tights in sub-zero temperatures—there was a frosted white Christmas tree, mounds of faux snowflakes and mannequins with side ponytails and neon bows. But the Public Garden had the grandest display of holiday wattage, with garlands of twinkling lights strung up on stately elms and magical weeping willows. Green, blue, red, white—for two straight months the town turned into one giant electricity suck.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Connecting Broadly Won’t Replace the Importance of Connecting Deeply

How will the internet affect the human brain and human culture as a whole?

The following is an excerpt from Brain Power: From Neurons to Networks, a new film and TED Book.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles