GOOD

A Biofuel Revolution Transforms Slaughterhouse to Powerhouse

How red meat is leading to green energy and big money for Uganda's livestock industry

Image by Thomas Bjørkan via Wikimedia Commons

Over the past few years, Uganda (like many nations in East Africa) has made huge strides in its attempts at expanding its agricultural processing facilities. Part of a wider strategy of economic growth and diversification, the idea is to boost the value of existing farmland by helping farmers to store, package, and ship en masse. Yet while this gambit has worked wonders for GDP and job creation, it’s also come with a fair amount of ecological backlash as these new facilities guzzle down power and spew out noxious byproducts into a nation without the facilities to handle them.

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Raising Up Through Hip-Hop

Nas-produced documentary Shake The Dust follows b-boys and crews from Yemen to Uganda, showcasing the resilient spirit of hip-hop.

Shake the Dust premieres on Vimeo today. Special thanks to Bond/360 for images

https://vimeo.com/ondemand/shakethedust/124553461[/vimeo]

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Uganda’s Growing Break Dancing Scene

As a photographer introduces Western audiences to the b-boys and -girls of Uganda, a local agency teaches kids how to pop and lock.

A dancer at the Batalo East Festival. Photo by Kibuuka Mukisa Oscar

A region of Uganda was once infamously declared “the worst place to be a child” by Keith McKenzie, head of the UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) in Uganda.

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Uniting World Cultures Through Children's Literature

Teach Twice educates children and their communities through stories and the exchange of culture.

One book can bring two different worlds together. That’s what two Vanderbilt students believed when they founded Teach Twice, "a social venture that educates children and their communities through stories and the exchange of culture."

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Joseph Kony and the Moral Ambiguity of the Modern World

The film everyone's talking about reminds us that hardly anything is black and white anymore.


One week ago, nonprofit group Invisible Children started a firestorm on the Internet with its Kony 2012 video. At first glance, the 30-minute film seemed innocuous, a passionate plea to get the world interested in the plight of Ugandans and other Africans forced to confront the murderous rebel leader Joseph Kony. But soon the backlash began. And then came the backlash against the backlash, which later led to backlash against the backlash against the backlash.

Essentially calling the film pointless, Foreign Policy wrote, "[I]t is unclear how millions of well-meaning but misinformed people are going to help deal with the more complicated reality." The Atlantic questioned Invisible Children's financial dealings. And still others saw the video as another toothless addition to the "guilty white liberal" genre. Writing for GOOD, Ugandan-American Patrick Kigongo wrote, "At best, Kony 2012 is a hyper-simplification of a complicated issue. It allows most of us to skip the frank, involved discussion in favor of just furthering a meme."

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The Avon of Africa: How Micro-Entrepreneurs Can Fight Poverty

Joy Twinomusasizi found dignity, income and the chance to help her community thanks to an organization that supports micro-entrepreneurs.


Joy Twinomusasizi earns a living selling essential health projects at affordable prices. See more pictures of Joy and Kampala, Uganda in our slideshow.

It didn’t rain last night, but driving over the muck and debris, it's hard to tell. The streets were so waterlogged that we eventually had to get out of our car and walk.

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