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A Biofuel Revolution Transforms Slaughterhouse to Powerhouse

How red meat is leading to green energy and big money for Uganda's livestock industry

Image by Thomas Bjørkan via Wikimedia Commons

Over the past few years, Uganda (like many nations in East Africa) has made huge strides in its attempts at expanding its agricultural processing facilities. Part of a wider strategy of economic growth and diversification, the idea is to boost the value of existing farmland by helping farmers to store, package, and ship en masse. Yet while this gambit has worked wonders for GDP and job creation, it’s also come with a fair amount of ecological backlash as these new facilities guzzle down power and spew out noxious byproducts into a nation without the facilities to handle them.

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The Solar Charging Kit for Africa You Want for Your Own Home

A solar charger built for Africa has found unexpected success with American customers. It's "trickle-up innovation."

Mike Lin and Brian Warshawski find themselves in the unusual but enviable position of having stumbled on an unexpected business hit. The pair set out with a social goal and built a product for poor Ugandans. But this week, the gadget the pair built to help poor Africans without electricity start micro businesses has proven to be popular with American customers. Their power system for rural Africa makes for a pretty handy camping tool as it turns out.

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Recycled Amusement: A Ugandan Playground of Water Bottles

Eco-artist Ruganzu Bruno Tusingwire will use a prize from TED to create a water-bottle playground in Kampala, Uganda

Ugandan eco-artist Ruganzu Bruno Tusingwire doesn’t play around when it comes to play. The winner of TED’s first City 2.0 Award for 2012, a prize designed to encourage innovation in cities, is using part of his $10,000-prize to construct an amusement park for kids in Kampala’s slums built from thousands of reused plastic water bottles. The playground—which currently consists of a single airplane-shaped sculpture—will serve as a commentary on the trash problem afflicting the rapidly expanding cities of the developing world. But that’s tangential to the project’s central motivation: to create a safe space for Uganda’s poorest youth, many of whom are afflicted by the psychological burdens of war, poverty, and disease.

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'There's a Rabid Hunger to Criticize': A 'Kony 2012' Creator Defends the Film A 'Kony 2012' Creator Defends the Film

The most popular internet video in years has sparked tears and controversy. We talked to one guy who started the madness.


When Jedidiah Jenkins and the rest of the team at Invisible Children put their Kony 2012 mini-doc on YouTube and Vimeo on Monday, their goal was to get 500,000 views before 2013. Four days later, the video has garnered 52 million views, due in large part to its success on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, and news sites around the world. Even gossip sites like Radar got in on the action, publishing "7 Things You Should Know About Joseph Kony" next to stories about Lindsay Lohan. But not all the attention was favorable. While Invisible Children’s film introduced millions to Joseph Kony and the atrocities of his Lord’s Resistance Army, dozens of scholars and critics have derided it as simplistic, erroneous, and colonialist. Others call Invisible Children "manipulative."

Invisible Children has already taken to its website to address some of the criticism. But GOOD conducted one of the first interviews in which Jenkins, director of ideology for Invisible Children and a major part of the film's production, takes us deeper into exactly what his organization hopes to accomplish with Kony 2012. We've omitted the part when Jenkins had to take another call from the infamous celebrity site TMZ. What a difference a week makes.

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