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Climate Action Tracker

In 2016, 196 countries signed the Paris Agreement, pledging to combat climate change by taking action to curb the increase in global temperatures. The Paris Agreement requires countries to report on their emissions and what steps they're taking to implement those plans. Now that the countries are coming together again for the U.N. Climate Action Summit in New York City, it's worth taking a look at what kind of progress they've made.

The Climate Action Trackerkeeps tabs on what each country is doing to limit warming, and if they're meeting their self-set goals. Countries are graded based on whether or not their actions would help limit warming to 1.5 degrees C.

According to a recent article from National Geographic, The Gambia, Morocco, and India are at the head of the class. "Even though carbon emissions in The Gambia, Morocco, and India are expected to rise, they'll fall short of exceeding the 1.5-degree Celsius limit," the article reads. Saudi Arabia, Russia and the United States, on the other hand, get a big fat F. "Projected emissions in Saudi Arabia, Russia, and the United States are far greater than what it would take to limit warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius."

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The Planet

Would you eat insects? The United Nations released a massive report this year arguing that bugs are good for us—healthy, nutritious, cheap, and many times better for the environment than meat. It's not the first time world leaders have made the case for bugs. And while actually eating insects may be a hard step for many to take, there's now a new design to make it a little more convenient.

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VIDEO: An Anti-Homophobia Riddle From the UN

The UN Human Rights office released this video as part of their "Free & Equal" campaign against homophobia.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYFNfW1-sM8

The UN Human Rights office released this video as part of their "Free & Equal" campaign against homophobia.

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COP16 Cancún Climate Talks: Everything You Need to Know

Expectations for the Cancún climate talks in were low. Thankfully, outcomes surpassed expectations.


The Cancún climate talks have wrapped up with some surprising optimism and positivity. At COP16, parties collectively agreed to put aside for awhile the thornier issues—like specific emissions reductions targets and the "common but differentiated responsibilities" of developing and developed nations—that have long caused utter stalemate in the UNFCCC. Delegates approved, with necessary consensus, a set of decisions that formally recognize emissions pledges, create a Green Climate Fund, and launch a process to reduce deforestation in the tropics.

I say "necessary consensus," but the Bolivian delegation actually never supported the measure. In fact, some are saying that the COP chair's willingness to push these decisions through without unanimous consensus is a sign that the UNFCCC body actually is agile enough to be productive.

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Th!nk About It: Climate Change Contest to Cover COP16 in Cancun

A contest to send one lucky and talented blogger to Cancun in December to cover the COP16 climate change conference.

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