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A Racially Segregated City Gets a Lift to the 21st Century

The prospect of owning a car in Cape Town, South Africa means different things to different people. For some, it’s a non-negotiable way to get...


The prospect of owning a car in Cape Town, South Africa means different things to different people. For some, it’s a non-negotiable way to get around—so much so that most white residents think nothing of hopping in a car to travel a short distance that might actually be better served by walking. But for much of the city’s non-white population living in townships at the periphery, but working in the city center, owning a car is a luxury they may need, but can’t afford.

Racial and economic stratification exists in most modern cities. But until recently, the very thing that often serves as the great equalizer in major metropolises—public transportation—was notably absent from Cape Town. However, with the roll-out of the MyCiTi Bus system, which debuted in the second half of last year, the Mother City is getting its first taste of what it might be like to have a fully-functioning public transportation system.

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What Would You Share if You Found a Diary Tied to a Park Bench?

If you happened upon a diary tied to a bench with an invitation to write anything and the understanding that anyone can read your anonymous entry, what would you write?

If you happened upon a diary tied to a bench with an invitation to write anything and the understanding that anyone can read your anonymous entry, what would you write?

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Walkable Cities are Good News for Small Business

Cities that support getting out of the car are better for small businesses, and the trend towards walkable cities is only speeding up.



When a city is more walkable—supporting pedestrians with narrower streets, wide sidewalks, and nearby recreational outlets—shops are frequented more often and do far better than those in less walkable areas.

A report issued by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found that “businesses appear to do better in a walkable commercial areas than in areas attracting mainly drive-to patronage.”

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These Haunting Images From Space Show Climate Change Up Close

Through the Landsat program, a series of satellites it launched into space to to take images of our increasingly transforming planet.

In 1984 Madonna ruled the airwaves, Apple's Macintosh personal computer went on sale, Iran accused Iraq of using chemical weapons, and The Chicago White Sox defeated the Milwaukee Brewers 7-6 in the longest game in Major League Baseball history. That's what happened on a micro level. In 1984, however, the Earth, as always, was changing, shifting, growing, and shrinking. That's the year when NASA had the foresight to capture it all, through the Landsat program, a series of satellites it launched into space to take images of our transforming planet.

Two generations, eight satellites and millions of pictures later, NASA, in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey, have compiled a remarkable catalog of their visual findings that show how our planet has evolved on a macro level. Partnering with Google, they've released these images to the public both as stills and videos that show the world through time lapsed footage.

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