GOOD

A Racially Segregated City Gets a Lift to the 21st Century

The prospect of owning a car in Cape Town, South Africa means different things to different people. For some, it’s a non-negotiable way to get...


The prospect of owning a car in Cape Town, South Africa means different things to different people. For some, it’s a non-negotiable way to get around—so much so that most white residents think nothing of hopping in a car to travel a short distance that might actually be better served by walking. But for much of the city’s non-white population living in townships at the periphery, but working in the city center, owning a car is a luxury they may need, but can’t afford.

Racial and economic stratification exists in most modern cities. But until recently, the very thing that often serves as the great equalizer in major metropolises—public transportation—was notably absent from Cape Town. However, with the roll-out of the MyCiTi Bus system, which debuted in the second half of last year, the Mother City is getting its first taste of what it might be like to have a fully-functioning public transportation system.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

What Would You Share if You Found a Diary Tied to a Park Bench?

If you happened upon a diary tied to a bench with an invitation to write anything and the understanding that anyone can read your anonymous entry, what would you write?

If you happened upon a diary tied to a bench with an invitation to write anything and the understanding that anyone can read your anonymous entry, what would you write?

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Walkable Cities are Good News for Small Business

Cities that support getting out of the car are better for small businesses, and the trend towards walkable cities is only speeding up.



When a city is more walkable—supporting pedestrians with narrower streets, wide sidewalks, and nearby recreational outlets—shops are frequented more often and do far better than those in less walkable areas.

A report issued by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found that “businesses appear to do better in a walkable commercial areas than in areas attracting mainly drive-to patronage.”

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

These Haunting Images From Space Show Climate Change Up Close

Through the Landsat program, a series of satellites it launched into space to to take images of our increasingly transforming planet.

In 1984 Madonna ruled the airwaves, Apple's Macintosh personal computer went on sale, Iran accused Iraq of using chemical weapons, and The Chicago White Sox defeated the Milwaukee Brewers 7-6 in the longest game in Major League Baseball history. That's what happened on a micro level. In 1984, however, the Earth, as always, was changing, shifting, growing, and shrinking. That's the year when NASA had the foresight to capture it all, through the Landsat program, a series of satellites it launched into space to take images of our transforming planet.

Two generations, eight satellites and millions of pictures later, NASA, in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey, have compiled a remarkable catalog of their visual findings that show how our planet has evolved on a macro level. Partnering with Google, they've released these images to the public both as stills and videos that show the world through time lapsed footage.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Capital Knowledge: IDEAS City Festival Touches Down in NYC

IDEAS City is a four-day festival and meeting of the minds that hopes to explore the future of cities around the globe.

Celebrating all things theoretical (and possible), the 2013 IDEAS City conference kicked off at the New Museum in New York this past Wednesday with a keynote address by MIT Media Lab’s Joi Ito. Speaking to the unlimited potential of the internet as it continues to transform society in substantial and positive ways, Ito was the perfect figure to usher in this massive consciousness-raising event.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Here at SeeClickFix we're celebrating Neighborday, April 27, with the GOOD community. And in that neighborly spirit, we're encouraging our users from around the globe to get out in their neighborhoods and not only document places where they want to see improvement, but get their hands dirty and partake in a neighborhood cleanup or beautification project.
Winter was brutal for many of us. Snow plows and disrupted garbage routes have left many neighbors reporting huge amounts of litter and dumping. Our cities need our help to make them the places we want to live.
Taking a cue from SeeClickFixers everywhere, and the greater movement towards neighborhood participation, we are shifting the SeeClickFix branding a bit. To start, the wrench and fist—our existing logo representing the community demanding accountability—will shift to the heart, representing the community being partially accountable itself.
“WrenchHeart,” as we are lovingly titling our new mascot, represents a move toward co-delivery of services between neighbors and governments. Our slogan will also shift, from "Power to the Community" to "Love Thy Neighborhood." Nothing about the platform will change; we’re just trying to do a better job reflecting the way communities as a whole take care of themselves, from all perspectives.
Just in time for Neighborday, here are three ways you can use SeeClickFix to help beautify your neighborhood:
    \n
  • Report areas of your neighborhood that could use a clean-up.
  • Make your neighborhood more interesting by reporting suggestions for murals, trees, benches and other public amenities. If you’re looking for some help to raise money for a project let us know and we’ll help you with the fundraising.
  • Search your neighborhood SeeClickFix page for words like "garbage" and comment on the issue that you’d like to organize a clean-up.
  • \n
It’s good to Love Thy Neighborhood. Let’s do it in a constructive way that makes a real impact for ourselves and our neighbors.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles