GOOD

It is impossible to build a sustainable or resilient society without expanding wealth. Things like renewable energy and materials, recycling and other methods of resource recovery, or collaborative consumption are essential ingredients for sustainability, but they are not nearly enough. Without a concurrent, dramatic expansion of wealth, there will be continued recession, economic hardship, and political destabilization, which are certainly not the ingredients of a sustainable society.

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Save the Rich! The Poor Saps Who Lost Millions to Citizens United's Super PACs

The rich got conned by the Supreme Court and now these pillars of our economy are down multiple millions of dollars.

Do you know what you can do with $19.5 million? No? Neither do I. I have no idea. It's not really an issue for me.

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Why Millennials Want To Be Rich

We've heard the message loud and clear: If you don't want to be poor, you have to be rich.

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Ten Commencement Speakers You Wish You'd Had

These ten speakers inspired but still kept it real with their audiences, making their graduation speeches memorable years after they were given.


Graduation is an exciting time, but let's face it: Commencement speeches aren't always memorable. A completely unscientific poll of the GOOD office revealed that almost none of us recall our college commencement speakers, or what they said to us (although we suspect it was something like, "You've worked hard! Yay!"). So here are 10 commencement speakers—and their inspiring, funny, and just plain on-point words of wisdom—that we wish we'd heard on graduation day.

1. Steve Jobs, Stanford University, 2005: Jobs hits all the right notes in this speech, in which he shares his own humble upbringings and reflects on his pancreatic cancer diagnosis. He told the crowd, "Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart."

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The Real Difference Between "Macs" and "PCs": Macs Are Much Richer

An old study about computer users' incomes sheds some light on the new "PC vs. Mac" infographic.


A new poll that found people who identified as "Mac people" were more urbane and progressive than "PC people" has led most to exclaim, "No duh." But, as we suggested yesterday, our assumption was that the real relevant difference between Mac users and PC users wasn't the kind of food they liked, but how much money they have. It turns out that our inclination was correct.

According to an apparently forgotten 2009 study from the consumer-research firm NDP, a full 36 percent of Mac users report household incomes greater than $100,000, while only 21 percent of PC users are that rich. With all that extra money, the average Apple household also owns 48 consumer electronics devices, beating out the average PC household's 24. And because Mac users tend to be better educated than their PC counterparts, they're afforded even more opportunity to amass money in the competitive job market.

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