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Mass Wikipedia Edit To Make The Internet Less Sexist

Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon gives women artists their digital due this weekend at the MoMA.

This Saturday, one tech-savvy group is hoping to correct a major gender imbalance on the internet. After the recent, much publicized GamerGate controversy, in which several female developers and cultural critics were victims of a “sustained campaign of misogynistic attacks” and advanced trolling, this help is certainly needed. The Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, currently in its second year, is an all-day mass update of Wikipedia entries pertaining to art and women, meant to increase female involvement with, and coverage on, the predominantly male website. Wikipedia’s problems with gender distribution are legendary, and a 2011 survey by the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 8.5% of contributors were female. This has led (by default) to a paucity of entries on seminal women—especially in the arts. To help rectify this, on March 7th, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) will turn the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Education and Research Building into mission control for a vast international effort to help promote, create, and edit articles on female artists and movements. At last year’s event, participants at 31 locations created more than 100 new articles and added content to another 90. This year’s Edit-a-thon, falling conveniently on International Women’s Day weekend (March 7-8, 2015), will incorporate 55+ satellite events internationally, taking place simultaneously at the Stedelijk Museum in the Netherlands, the Dowse Art Museum in New Zealand, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC. and many others.

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For a Growing Number of College Students, Wikipedia Is Homework

With 20 million articles in 283 languages, Wikipedia is the world's go-to reference. Can student editors make it more accurate?


Wikipedia doesn't have a stellar reputation for scholarly accuracy, but its staggering collection of 20 million articles in 283 languages has nonetheless made it the go-to reference for the world's students—it's even the most plagiarized source on college campuses. Now, a growing number of professors are bucking the anti-Wikipedia trend and assigning a new kind of homework: editing the site's articles.

According to the Wikimedia Foundation blog, professors from nine nations are participating in the two-year-old Wikipedia Education Program, which allows them to assign articles to their students. In the United States, about 50 classes are participating in the editing effort. Student contributors "are expected to put in as much work into the Wikipedia assignments as they would put into a term paper or other large assignment," the program's founders say. The students are guided through the editing process by their professor, trained in-person "campus ambassadors," and virtual mentors.

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When Wikipedia Founder Jimmy Wales Personally Appeals, You Pay (Infographic)

When Jimmy makes a personal appeal, people fork over cash.

Wikipedia solicits money from supporters in all sorts of ways, but, as Information Is Beautiful illustrates with the following infographic, there's one approach that brings in the big bucks: "Please read: A personal appeal from Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales."

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The marriage of two concepts that err on the side of sharing information.

The recent publishing of the Afghan War Diary on WikiLeaks put that website in the news like never before. WikiLeaks described it as “an extraordinary compendium of over 91,000 reports covering the war in Afghanistan from 2004 to 2010.” Though some find the content to be mostly ordinary, the U.S. government is peeved enough to demand the return of the info. It’s the biggest leaking case since Richard Armitage snitched out Valerie Plame back in 2003. Given the hubbub, it’s a great time to look at the word “WikiLeaks.”\n

The website WikiLeaks has been around since 2007 and is a self-described “multi-jurisdictional public service designed to protect whistleblowers, journalists, and activists who have sensitive materials to communicate to the public.” The amount of material on the site is brain-boggling: Just a glance through the site turns up documents on Guantanamo Bay’s use of psychologists in torture, Henry Kissinger transcripts from the 1970s, info on the nuclear capability of many nations, descriptions of secret fraternity rituals, and the “Command Chart of Scientology.” Seeking to be “a buttress against unaccountable and abusive power,” the site provides a forum for concerned folks in the know—whether in government, business, or elsewhere—to share information. Their goals are lofty: “What conscience cannot contain, and institutional secrecy unjustly conceals, WikiLeaks can broadcast to the world.”

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