GOOD


In the wake of a disaster, supplying shelter to the displaced is crucial. Taking its aesthetic cues from a tent (albeit a forward-thinking, futuristic one), the unfolding disaster relief shelters of German interior design firm Form-Al combine speedy humanitarianism with smart design. The flat-pack shelter, recently unveiled at the DMY International Design Festival Berlin, is made of light composite panels that come in small dimensions for compact building in the event of a disaster.

Treehugger, off a tip from Designboom, has more on the instant shelters, which impressively expand from about 80 to180 square feet when unfolded.

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The dire state of our oceans goes well beyond the scope of the Gulf Oil spill; major pollution, rising sea levels, and the encroaching extinction of much of the ocean’s wildlife have long been problems. But those issues can be difficult to connect to tangible aspects of our everyday lives. To bring home some of the more immediate costs of an imbalanced ocean, Treehugger asked Andrew Sharpless, CEO for the Oceana ocean protection organization, to pitch six concrete reasons why protecting our oceans should be important to us all.

Those who care about bolstering the economy and jobs should care about the sea, Sharpless says, as he links the declining state of the ocean to the declining state of the economy:

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The journalist and GOOD regular Brian Merchant is championing an unpopular cause: to counter the negative effects of oil’s production, he believes we should be paying more for gasoline. Not just gas, though, but a heap of other goods and services, like electricity produced by coal-generated power plants.

Why? In a recent Treehugger post, Merchant explains that we're “underpaying for goods that have hidden costs every day.” His reasoning rests upon the economic concept of the externality, an “effect of a purchase or use decision by one set of parties on others who did not have a choice and whose interests were not taken into account.”

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You probably made a mixtape back in the day. And from the safety of retrospection, you can admit filling it with all the Morrissey-provided angst it could fit, all in hopes of communicating the depths of your love to that girl in third period you could only manage to speak to in monosyllables.

Today, your earnest masterpiece is most likely one of many abandoned cassette tapes collecting dust in garages, closets, and thrift stores across America-square victims of both the CD and MP3 player. But mixed-media artist Erika Iris Simmons has found a creative way to breathe new life into the outmoded media, creating portraits of rock icons using the uncoiled ribbon within the tapes.

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