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North Korea to Donald Trump: Delete Your Account

Trump’s tweets go from “unpresidented” to deadly serious

History books are filled with stories of how terrible wars were started. The assassination of Austrian archduke Franz Ferdinand triggered WWI. Hitler invading Poland and the bombing of Pearl Harbor are two tragic catalysts for WWII. It’s hard to imagine how future historians will one day frame a looming conflict with North Korea and the United States: “You see, there was this thing called Twitter.”

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Richard Simmons And The Agony Of Empathy

There’s a lot to feel in the hit podcast about the world’s most eccentric fitness guru

“I call you Saint Richard. Because that’s who you are.”

It’s four in the morning—modern life’s most vulnerable hour—when a semi-depressed 14-year-old with light insomnia catches the beginning of an infomercial starring Richard Simmons. It’s the late ‘80s, and Simmons, in his signature tank-top and silky shorts, sits across a woman named Rosa. Rosa is, by her own estimation and that of her doctor, significantly overweight. She hates her body. She hates herself. She hides from the world. Now, she’s in front of Saint Richard, who has promised he will rescue her from her hellish existence with Deal-a-Meal, one of the fitness guru’s numerous, profitable diet products.

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The Solution To Donald Trump Isn’t Impeachment

There’s a better, smarter, long term stategy

The fantasies abound, don’t they? Visions of that day in some not-so-far-off future, where President Donald J. Trump finally pulls some outrageous, undeniably unconstitutional Easy-D, and gets his executive comeuppance.

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Editor’s Letter

Editor in chief Nancy Miller revisits GOOD’s roots for the 10th anniversary issue

“We see a growing number of people tied together not by age, career, background, or circumstance, but by a shared interest. This revolves around a passion for potential mixed with fierce pragmatism and creative engagement. We sum this all up as the sensibility of giving a damn. But to shorten it, let’s call it GOOD. We’re here to push this movement and cover its realization.” —Ben Goldhirsh, co-founder of GOOD

There’s fire in those words, written a decade ago by one of the co-founders of this magazine to announce the first issue. It was a rallying cry that united a restless group of purpose-driven people who wanted to make a difference. What they ended up making was a media company with a durability and influence that remain exceptional, given the seismic shifts the past decade has brought to the way ideas are generated and disseminated.

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Editor’s Letter

Editor in Chief Nancy Miller offers insight into the making of GOOD’s new Money Issue

Let’s begin with a show of hands: Who balances their checkbook? Anyone? No? How about a 401(k)? If you have a job that actually offers one, do you know what’s in your portfolio? If your current emotional state is clocking in somewhere between confusion and panic, don’t worry. You’re not alone. Over the course of putting together GOOD’s new Money Issue, we discovered that pretty much everything we’ve been taught to believe about work and money is woefully outdated. Nothing against the hard won wisdom of parents and grandparents, but you need a fresh roadmap to charting your financial future.

That’s where our GOOD Guide to Money comes in. From apprenticeship to entrepreneurship, permalancing to crowdfunding, the rules of how, why, and where we work have changed. That means the way we earn, save, spend, and share our hard-earned cash is unprecedented, and vastly different than our parents’ generation. To help us sort it all out, we asked industry pros for the smartest, most innovative approaches to thriving in the gig economy: thinkers like philanthropist Melinda Gates, radical altruist Peter Singer, urban theorist Richard Florida, and designer/technologist John Maeda.

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